Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    I was tempted to call this Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal “German Christmas Market Oatmeal”, as that’s essentially what it tastes like. Minus the Mulled wine, which I guess would just be weird in oats. It has the spices, caramelised apple flavour, creamy vanilla-caramel taste and all topped with spices caramelised almonds. This is a worthy oatmeal for Christmas morning, yet still has you covered nicely on the nutrition front with added protein.

     

    Why You Want to Make This

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    German Christmas Market in a Bowl

    Who wouldn’t want a Christmas market tasting, steaming bowl of oatmeal in the morning, right? I mean, it’s getting rather cold here in Ireland and all I want in the morning is, to wrap myself around a hot bowl of yummy breakfast. Bonus points for deliciousness.

    More often than not, it’s a very simple Blueberry-Apple Oatmeal with protein powder mixed in, but for the season I wanted something a little more special.

    So I figured I’ll try to get it as close to the thing I miss most about Germany during this time of the year: Christmas Markets.

    Thinking about the essence of those for me, two things popped into my mind: Caramelised, spiced almonds and candy apples. Which is how this Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal came into play.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds (optional)

    These have their own recipe, as they are entirely optional, but very delicious!
    I made a few versions of them, the simplest and quickest topping my Banoffee Protein Mousse Pie which is just taken to the point of the caramelised sugar crystallizing again and clinging to the almonds.

    The version for this Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal is taken a good bit further, to shiny caramel perfection, and just as suited as topping as it is for a snack in its own right. Or a lovely homemade Christmas gift. So better make a lager batch, as you’ll absolutely want to nibble them! (She says, sneaking into the kitchen and grabbing the last piece of them).

    Stewed Caramel Apples

    Where was I? Ah, yes. Oatmeal. Now I can’t really include a whole crunchy, candy apple in my bowl (Please send pictures if you tried!). But I sure can capture the flavour. So I slowly let a little bit of honey caramelise and then add the chopped apples and spices, stewing them to perfection for a few minutes.

    Protein

    As always, I’m adding protein powder (For flavour and the benefits it provides) mixed with ½ cup of Soy milk towards the very end of the cooking time, to just heat it through, achieving a custardy creaminess in the Oats which I absolutely love.

    Very little added Sugar

    Usually I add no sugar at all to my oats, as I feel the fruits and protein powder add plenty of sweetness, but we need some for the almonds here (No sugar, no caramel unfortunately) and a little maple syrup for the apples. But it’s by no means a lot and I would still happily count Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal as healthy breakfast, even though it tastes utterly indulgent.

     

    The Ingredients

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal_Ingredients

    Protein Powder – As usual I’m using MyProtein here.
    In this particular case I just got a new bag of Toasted Marshmallow Flavour, which worked a treat with the general caramel theme.
    This is neither affiliated nor sponsored. Just the powder I found to taste best after trying a fair few. If you never found one you actually enjoy, give this one a try.

    Rolled Oats – As I enjoy the texture they give me and feel they are a bit more wholesome than the slightly more processed instant or porridge oats. But use what you prefer or have. If using instant oats, adjust the cooking time, as they need less time to get creamy.

    Milk – Since I’m lactose intolerant when it comes to any unfermented milk products, I’m using unsweetened almond milk for cooking the oats and soy milk to mix the protein powder and add towards the end, for delicious custardy creaminess.

    Apple – I always have Pink Lady around, as I love its sweetness with gentle acidity. And they are easily available in all supermarkets here. Use whatever apple you enjoy.

    Spices – I’m adding a mix of Cinnamon, allspice, ground ginger, clove, nutmeg, and a pinch of salt for balance. If you just have cinnamon, that’s delicious too.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds – The recipe here makes more than you need for one portion of the oats. But once you made them, you’ll want more to nibble on. So better even double the recipe, to have some for guests and loved ones, popping by around this time of the year.

    Honey – I used honey to caramelize the apple in it. You could use maple syrup or sugar instead.

    The Process

    To make your Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal, prepare the optional Caramelised Spiced Almonds as per this recipe if you decided to use them. You can keep them around for about a week in an airtight container.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Caramelise the Apple

    Add honey to a cooking pot and let it bubble and caramelize on medium/high heat for a few minutes.
    Stir in the chopped apple, ground cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg, and cloves. Ensuring it’s coated with the fragrant, caramelised layer of spices and honey.

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal_Process
    Cook until the apple softens slightly. If it gets too dry, add a tablespoon of water. Transfer 1/3 of the mixture to a bowl for topping later.

    Cook the Oats

    Add oats and unsweetened almond milk to your pot, stirring, and let it boil gently until the milk is mostly absorbed. Meanwhile, shake the protein powder and the soy milk, to get a custard like consistency.

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal_Process

    Stir your protein “custard” to the oats until well combined. Lower the heat and just gently warm the whole mix while stirring, until the liquid is mostly absorbed but the oats are still creamy.

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal_Process

    Serve

    Transfer into a serving bowl. Garnish with the remaining apples and top with caramelised almonds and, if you like, with a little more cinnamon.

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    Enjoy your Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal, feeling like you are walking over a German Christmas Market.

    Looking for more Christmas recipes?

    Try my Cranberry Rosemary Roasted Chicken for a delicious and easy dinner. Or Sourdough Brioche Feuilltee, for an impressive breakfast that you can prepare ahead.

    Please Comment

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal

    I was tempted to call this Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal “German Christmas Market Oatmeal, as that’s essentially what it tastes like. Minus the Mulled wine, which I guess would just be weird in oats. It has the spices, caramelised apple flavour, creamy vanilla-caramel taste and all topped with spices caramelised almonds. This is a worthy oatmeal for Christmas morning, yet still has you covered nicely on the nutrition front with added protein.
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Cook Time 15 minutes
    Total Time 20 minutes
    Course Breakfast, Dessert
    Cuisine American
    Servings 1
    Calories 380 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 apple washed and chopped into bite sized pieces, without peeling
    • 1 tbsp honey or maple syrup
    • 1 tsp butter or olive oil for the pan
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
    • ¼ tsp EACH of ground ginger allspice and nutmeg.
    • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
    • ½ cup rolled oats
    • 1 cup unsweetened almond milk
    • 1 scoop protein powder I used MyProtein Toasted Marshmallow
    • ½ cup soy milk
    • 2 tbsp Caramelised Spiced Almonds optional

    Instructions
     

    Prepare Caramelised Spiced Almonds:

    • Follow the recipe for Caramelised Spiced Almonds and set them aside. These can be stored in an airtight container for about a week.

    Caramelize the Apple:

    • Add honey to a cooking pot and let it bubble and caramelize on medium/high heat for a few minutes.
    • Stir in the chopped apple, ground cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg, and cloves. Ensuring it's coated with the fragrant, caramelised layer of spices and honey.
    • Cook until the apple softens slightly. If it gets too dry, add a tablespoon of water. Transfer 1/3 of the mixture to a bowl for topping later.

    Prepare Oatmeal Base:

    • In the same pot, add oats and unsweetened almond milk. Stir and let it gently boil until the milk is mostly absorbed.
    • Meanwhile, shake the protein powder and soy milk to achieve a custard-like consistency.

    Combine Oats and Protein Custard:

    • Add the protein "custard" to the oats and stir until well combined.
    • Lower the heat and gently warm the mixture while stirring until the liquid is mostly absorbed, and the oats are creamy.

    Serve:

    • Pour the Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal into a serving bowl.
    • Garnish with the remaining spiced apples and top with Caramelised Spiced Almonds if using.
    • If desired, sprinkle a little more cinnamon on top.

    Notes

    Calories: Approximately 380 kcal
    Protein: Around 20g
    Carbohydrates: Roughly 60g
    Fat: About 8g
    Fiber: Around 10g
    Sugar: Approximately 25g

    Nutrition

    Calories: 380kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    380
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Breakfast, Easy, fruit, Healthy, High Fibre, High Protein, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw

    If you are looking for the perfect side dish to complement my Black Garlic Aioli Burgers, this Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw is it. Crunchy white cabbage together with grated carrot, sweet, juicy apple, and a bit of onion for spice are smothered in a healthy cashew based Aioli with lots of fresh herbs and garlic. Light and refreshing, yet packs a punch in flavour, to stand up to the burger. Or any other main dish you have it with.

     

    Why You Want to Make This

     

    Healthy Aioli

    If you are like me and absolutely adore Aioli, but are not particularly keen on the nutrition balance, this is for you. The Cashews replace the oil and eggs, making this vegan too and giving you a much better nutrition to calorie balance than the classic version.
    Cashews are rich in fibre, protein and healthy fats, so they are a fantastic choice for weight loss.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli

    When soaked and pureed in a high speed blender like the Nutribullet or Vitamix, they become super creamy, which is perfect for coating any vegetables in your salad.

    Keeps Longer

    The fact that there are no raw eggs in this Herbed Cashew Aioli means you can store it for up to a week in your fridge, without issues. It will thicken further during that time, so just add some more water to get it back to dressing consistency.

    Vegetables made Delicious

    One of my main ways to lose 70lb in a years was to eat lots and lots of vegetables. I’m not one for boring food, so of course I had to prepare them in ways that make me really want to eat them. This is one of them. Crunchy fresh shredded cabbage with carrot and apple and a delicious dressing is one of my favourite ways to get my cruciferous veggie hit, as I love it to much, I could eat it by the bowl full. The good news? I can with this one! The Herbed Cashew Aioli does make the calories shoot through the roof and gives plenty of flavour to this slaw. You won’t miss the mayo one bit.

    Easy to Make

    If you have a food processor, the slicing and grating will only take seconds. If you do it by hand, only a few minutes. The dressing is equally easy, as you just throw everything into your high speed blender and a few seconds later you will have a perfectly creamy dressing you can use in a million ways.

    Note: You do need indeed a high speed blender like the Nutribullet or Vitamix to get the extra creamy consistency. I’ve tried a standard blender and food processor, but both leave some graininess. It’s not the end of the world, but not perfect either.

     

    The Ingredients

     

    The Slaw

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw_Ingredients

    Cabbage

    You can use white or red or a mix of both here, which will make this even prettier. I just could not find any red in the supermarkets when I was planning to make this, so white it was. Which is nice too, as it shows the lovely green herbs in the Cashew Aioli.
    Cabbage has, as all vegetables, lots of fibre and micronutrients to keep your body and gut healthy, which makes it generally a good idea to eat regularly.

    Carrots

    The same goes for carrots, which contain a lot of the important Vitamin A, which is great for your eyesight. Plus they add a lovely sweetness to coleslaw, so I always include them (and munch some one the side, because I just can’t resist a fresh carrot).

    My 2 dogs usually come running as soon as they hear me peel a carrot, since they know that’s the one thing they can have treats from when I’m cooking. I’ve trained them to lie down for treats, so they basically run in and drop flat on the floor, to get their carrot pieces faster.

    Apples

    Again different micronutrients in apples, but also fibre and antioxidants, more so in the peel than the flesh. So I usually leave it on.
    They will also add to the sweetness of this salad, which I love. Use any kind you like. Personally I enjoy Pink Lady, which are available in most supermarkets here and have a lovely balance between sweetness and acidity.

    Onions

    More veggies, more health benefits is always better.
    But onions of any kind come with the flavour backbone for so many dishes, you’d miss out not adding them to this slaw. I like red, for their sweetness and intense flavour usually, but since I had none, I used shallots, which worked just fine.

    The Herbed Cashew Aioli

    Herbed Cashew Aioli_Ingredients

    Cashews

    Cashews are the base for this Herbed Cashew Aioli, as the name suggests. They make a surprisingly creamy dressing when soaked in water and can easily replace mayonnaise in many recipes with just a few flavour additions.

    Raisins

    I’ve learned the handy trick of adding raisins instead of sugar in an episode of the Whole Food Plant Based Cooking Show and have not looked back since, I like it so much.
    If, like me, you enjoy your dressings with a bit of sweetness, this is a much healthier way to include it than highly processed sugar, as raisins still come with fibre and nutrients, which sugar does not. They also add a much more complex flavour than just sugar to the dressing, which is an added benefit.

    Herbs

    Again, really good for you, herbs generally elevate any dish from good to great by adding tons of flavour.
    I’m using a mix of fresh Dill, Parsley, Cilantro and Basil here, as that’s what I usually have at home and enjoy. You can experiment with any soft herbs you find, they will all be lovely.

    Fresh Garlic

    The basic version of Aioli is simply fresh garlic mashed with lots of olive oil and a bit of salt. It has evolved into the more mayonnaise type over time and is these days often used for any mayonnaise with flavourings in the US. To me, having tried Garlic mayo first and fallen in love with it, it will always be a version of that, hence the addition here.
    It’s what pulls together this coleslaw and my Black Garlic Aioli Burger and allows it to stand up to and support its strong flavours.

    Lemon Juice

    Any Aioli or dressing for that matter needs acidity to balance the fats. I chose lemon juice here, as I just love the flavour it brings together with the herbs. If you don’t have any, use white wine vinegar instead.

    Dijon Mustard

    Mustard is such an essential component of any mayonnaise (even nut based), it would taste bland without it. It adds sharpness, spice and that little something, to bring it all together.

    Liquid Aminos

    Liquid Aminos are a secret weapon for any nut based dressings I found. They add saltiness and a good hit of umami, which just makes them utterly moreish.

    If you don’t have any, replace with soy or Tamari sauce, though you might have to adjust the amount of raisins, as aminos are slightly sweeter than the other two.

    The Process

     

    The Herbed Cashew Aioli

    Soak your cashews in just boiled water for about 30 minutes or in cold water overnight.
    Drain and add to your high speed blender together with the remaining ingredients for the dressing.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw_Process

    Blend until very creamy. Taste and adjust the seasoning to your liking. Add some water if your Aioli is too thick to suit a coleslaw, but be mindful, as the slaw itself contains water too, which will mix with it.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli

    Assemble

    In a large bowl combine your shredded cabbage, grated carrots, sliced apples and onions with your Herbed Cashew Aioli. Mix well and chill for at least an hour, so the flavours can meld and seep through the slaw.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw_Process

    Enjoy as snack or as side with your favourite meals. It goes with anything from Burgers to BBQ that can use a bit of fresh, garlicky-herb crunch on the side.
    Or add it to other salads, to up your veggie intake in the best way possible.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw

    Meal Prep

     

    This Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw keeps in a lidded container the fridge for about 4 days and only gets better while sitting. I love to make it on my weekend, to have some fresh side dish with every meal during my work week.
    It’s great to take to a summer BBQ too, as there are no eggs that could spoil in the heat.

     

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw

    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw

    If you are looking for the perfect side dish to complement my Black Garlic Aioli Burgers, this Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw is it. Crunchy white cabbage together with grated carrot, sweet, juicy apple, and a bit of onion for spice are smothered in a healthy cashew based Aioli with lots of fresh herbs and garlic. Light and refreshing, yet packs a punch in flavour, to stand up to the burger. Or any other main dish you have it with.
    Prep Time 15 minutes
    Resting time 1 hour 30 minutes
    Total Time 1 hour 45 minutes
    Course Appetizer, Dinner, Salad, Side Dish, Snack
    Cuisine American
    Servings 6
    Calories 225 kcal

    Equipment

    • High Speed Blender

    Ingredients
      

    Slaw

    • ½ white cabbage or a mix of red and white, finely shredded
    • 2 carrots grated
    • 2 apples finely sliced
    • 1 onion finely sliced

    Herbed Cashew Aioli

    • ½ cup cashews
    • 2 tbsp raisins Try 1 tbsp first if you prefer your dressing on the more savoury side.
    • ½ tsp onion powder
    • 2 tbsp fresh dill
    • 2 tbsp fresh Parsley
    • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro
    • 2 tbsp fresh basil
    • 2 cloves fresh garlic
    • 2 tbsp lemon juice
    • 2 tsp Dijon mustard
    • 1 tbsp liquid aminos or Tamari or soy sauce. Liquid Aminos are slightly sweeter so you might have to adjust the seasoning if you are using one of the other options
    • ½ cup water
    • Salt and pepper to taste

    Instructions
     

    Herbed Cashew Aioli:

    • Soak cashews in just boiled water for about 30 minutes or in cold water overnight.
    • Drain cashews and add them to a high-speed blender along with raisins, onion powder, fresh dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, garlic, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, liquid aminos (or Tamari or soy sauce), water, salt, and pepper.
    • Blend until the mixture is creamy. Taste and adjust the seasoning if needed. Add water if the aioli is too thick, considering that the slaw contains water as well.

    Assembling the Slaw:

    • In a large bowl, combine shredded cabbage, grated carrots, sliced apples, and onions.
    • Pour the Herbed Cashew Aioli over the vegetables.
    • Mix the slaw thoroughly to ensure all the vegetables are coated with the aioli.
    • Chill the slaw in the refrigerator for at least an hour to allow the flavors to meld and permeate through the slaw.

    Serving:

    • Enjoy the Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw as a snack or a side dish with your favorite meals. It pairs well with anything from burgers to BBQ, providing a fresh, garlicky-herb crunch on the side.
    • Alternatively, use it as a topping for other salads to enhance your veggie intake in a delightful way.

    Notes

    Note: Feel free to adjust the quantities of herbs, spices, and other ingredients according to your taste preferences.
    This Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw keeps in a lidded container the fridge for about 4 days and only gets better while sitting. I love to make it on my weekend, to have some fresh side dish with every meal during my work week.
    6 Portions
    Slaw (Per Portion):
    Calories: Approximately 104 calories
    Protein: Approximately 2 grams
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 26 grams
    Fat: Approximately 0.5 grams
    Sodium: Approximately 35 milligrams
    Herbed Cashew Aioli (Per Portion):
    Calories: Approximately 121 calories
    Protein: Approximately 3 grams
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 8 grams
    Fat: Approximately 9 grams
    Sodium: Approximately 229 milligrams
    Now, let's add them together:
    Total Slaw with Herbed Cashew Aioli (Per Portion):
    Calories: Approximately 225 calories
    Protein: Approximately 5 grams
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 34 grams
    Fat: Approximately 9.5 grams
    Sodium: Approximately 264 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 225kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Herbed Cashew Aioli Slaw
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    225
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, Healthy, High Protein, Low Calorie, meal prep, vegan, vegetables, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    A moist and crunchy fall treat, these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have it all: Lots of soft and juicy apples, that get pre-cooked and smothered in cinnamon spiked sourdough-pumpkin puree mix. The Protein powder adds nutrition and sweetness, replacing part of the flour. A cinnamon sugar sprinkling gives an extra crunchy top in contrast to the soft insides.

    Why You Want to Make These

    In Autumn, we want apples and pumpkin for sure. But why choose one when you can have both, right? Right.
    I’m greedy, so I always want both. Why would I have to choose?

    While watching yet another great Claire Saffitz Video I remembered an apple cake very similar to hers I kept making when I was in my 20s. Unfortunately the recipe was lost, but it had pre-cooked apples and a very similar batter to the one in the video. So of course I had to make something similar.

    But, having evolved to incorporating sourdough and protein into pretty much everything sweet I bake, I made a few modifications, to be able to do both. And pumpkin Puree. Because more veggies are always a plus!

    Sourdough

    I’m using sourdough discard here, as we are not needing its rising power here and we don’t want to let it ferment either, since that would develop the gluten and lead to tougher muffins. Instead we are looking for light and tender. So the sourdough is mainly for adding tangy flavour, to contrast with the sweet pumpkin puree.
    And a way to use up sourdough discard, which is always welcome. If you prefer to make it without, replace with ½ cup liquid (more of the apple cooking liquid would be great) and 1/2 cup flour of your choice.

    Apples

    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have loads of apples. Layers of tender, cinnamon tasting pieces all throughout the dough, in every single bite.
    I achieved that by pre-cooking them with cinnamon in the oven, until they are really soft.
    I don’t want them to fall apart though, so I’m using Pink Lady apples, which keep their shape nicely and I leave the skin on. That will also keep the nutrition from the skin, which holds most of it.

    I quite enjoy a bit of acidity in my apples, hence the Pink Lady. They are easy to find in supermarkets and have just the right balance of sweet, intense apple flavour and fresh acidity with a firm flesh.
    If you enjoy a different type of apple, feel free to use it.

    One note: Even though Bramley apples or cooking apples are usually great for cooking, I wouldn’t use them here, as they just fall apart into a mush. And we want slices that hold their shape.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Ingredients

    Pumpkin Puree

    Its gentle sweetness and lovely orange colour makes pumpkin puree a great inclusion for many baked goods. These fluffy Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein for example or my Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein. With the added sweetness I need less refined sugar and get an extra dose of fibre instead.

    Since I live in Ireland, Fallon & Byrne seems to be the only shop that has Pumpkin Puree.
    And occasionally one American food shop online.
    If you live in the US: Lucky you! I hear you get it pretty much everywhere.

    And while I usually think most things are better from scratch, I don’t think I want to go through the effort of chopping, peeling, cooking, and de-watering a whole pumpkin to get this. So cans are just fine.

    Protein Powder

    As with so many of my recipes, I’m adding my favourite Protein Powder here. In this case “Cinnamon Danish” from “MyProtein”.
    This is neither affiliated nor sponsored. Just the powder I found to taste best after trying a fair few. If you never found one you actually enjoy, give this one a try.

    I’m replacing up to ¼ of the white flour with it, to up my protein intake and be able to lower the added sugar even more. So if you’d like to make the Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins without protein, replace 1:1 with flour and add some sugar. I’d say about 1 tbsp.

    Why Protein?

    If you read a few of my baked or breakfast recipes, you can skip this part. For those of you who haven’t:
    Personally I found, while tracking my macros during my weight loss journey, I’m not even close to eating enough of it every day, as I’m not the biggest fan of meat and pulses. And while nuts for example are a great source for protein, they also have a lot of calories, so I can add them only sparingly, if I want to keep my weight.

    Considering protein can help you keep your bones strong, help with building muscle, and help with feeling fuller for longer, I find it pretty important to get enough of it. And Protein powder is a very practical way for me to do so.

    Now of course I could just drink a protein shake or two per day, but I’d rather not drink my calories, and instead prefer to find ways to include it into my food.
    How do I do that? I replace up to ¼ of the flour and sugar in a recipe with it. Which, in my mind is a win/win situation.

    Flour

    For once I’m not mixing white and whole wheat flour but using only fine whole wheat flour, since it goes just so well with the apples with its nutty flavour. Plus, with these muffins being incredibly moist and juicy, it can soak up more of it.

    Olive Oil

    While butter could work here if melted, oil (you could also use coconut oil, if you don’t mine the flavour it adds) adds even more to the moist character. Batter with oil tends to be very tender and soft, which is the aim here.

    Spices

    You could use 2 tsp ready made pumpkin spice or make your own using the separate spices stated in the ingredients. If you are planning to make more pumpkin based recipes, it might pay out to prepare a bigger batch and keep it in an airtight container in your cupboard. It’ll last as long as the spices on their own would. Though if you do, use 1 tsp cinnamon, rather than ½ on the same amount of the other spices. Maybe add some clove if you like. Just a tiny amount, it can be overpowering.

    The Remaining Ingredients

    The raising agents are needed, because we won’t let the sourdough ferment and with that it won’t act as raising agent. But a bit of fluffiness is required. And since the apples and whole wheat would make this dough pretty heavy, there is a decent amount needed here.

    Apple Cider Vinegar activates the baking soda and gives a nice tang to these otherwise rather sweet muffins.

    The honey is used to sweeten the apples while pre-roasting and lends fantastic flavour to the dough later. Some brown sugar for sweetness, chewiness, and structure.

    Vanilla essence. How could I not? It just belongs into muffins or pretty much any sweet dough.

    Eggs of course. We are making muffins after all. And a hint of salt for balance.

    The Paper Muffin Cases

    I feel most of the time it doesn’t matter much, if you bake muffins with or without the little paper forms, but for these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein I would urge you to line your muffin tin with them, as they are just so juicy, they might stick too much to get them out or fall apart.

    The Process

    Pre-heat your oven to 175°C (350°F)

    Apples

    Slice the apples first. I just cut them straight down around the core, then sliced them thinly.
    If you have an apple corer, that will work really well, as you could just use a mandolin to slice after. Alas, I don’t own one, as I always found it leaves too much of the core in my apple. And that, to me, feels similar to surprisingly found fish bones. But then, I might just be weird.

    Now lay some baking parchment into an oven proof large dish that will hold all your sliced apples. We will stack them alternating apples with drizzles of honey. Finish with honey and a little bit of olive oil drizzled over, to keep them moist.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Bake for about 1h-1h15min, turning the apples every 15minutes, so the top doesn’t dry out and all bake evenly.

    Take them out to let them cool a while. Whatever you do: Do NOT throw out the liquid. The juices from the baking with all the flavour of apples and honey will provide the fluid content of the muffins. That was my favourite part from Claire’s Apple cake. It’s such a good use for them and adds so much flavour!

    Once they are cooled to room temperature, while holding back the apples, pour the liquid that has formed into a cup. Measure out ¼ cup.

    The Protein Powder

    If you read some of my recipes, you know what I’ll tell you and can skip ahead. If you haven’t, here is the secret to the protein powder being integrated into the batter without any lumps and floury texture: Pre-mix well with the wet ingredients.

    I often use my Nutribullet (again, neither affiliated, nor sponsored), add eggs, olive oil, the ¼ cup liquid from the apples, vanilla, pumpkin puree, apple cider vinegar, the protein powder and, if it fits the sugar and sourdough. Give it a 1 minute mix and admire the super creamy, fluffy mixture you just created.

    If you have no Nutribullet, any high speed blender will work. No blender or just a slow one? That or a bowl and a hand mixer or whisk are fine too. Without high speed blender however, add everything above except the olive oil. Mix until you have a creamy mixture, then, slowly, similar to making mayonnaise, first drizzle, then, once half is incorporated, stream in the olive all, while mixing. This will emulsify it instead of creating greasiness.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Mix the wet with the dry

    Mix the baking powder, spices, salt and flour in a large bowl. Add the creamy protein mix and stir until the four is just incorporated. Don’t overmix, to avoid tough muffins.

    Now take out some of the non-broken apple slices from the cooked apples and set aside for the top of the muffins. Carefully fold the rest into the batter.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Filling the Muffin Cases

    Line your muffin tin with paper muffin cases.
    If you don’t have any, grease your muffin tin really well, using melted butter and a pastry brush. Then dust some flour over them and shake, so the moulds are all well coated. I still wouldn’t guarantee you get all the muffins out perfectly, but this will give you the best chance.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Using either an ice/cookie scoop or 2 tablespoons, spoon your batter into the muffin cases. You can either make about 15-16 smaller muffins or 12 really large ones. I filled most of mine about 2/3, not wanting them to overflow. Then made 3 pretty full, to have the top puff up. Those 3 were my favourites in the end. But use your preferred shape.

    Top with the remaining apple slices and some brown sugar with cinnamon. About 2 tbsp with ½ tsp cinnamon works well. I used demerara sugar for this, as it gives the best crunch.

    Bake

    Bake at 175°C (350°F) for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.

    Let them cool a little, as they will be very soft straight from the oven and firm up a bit while cooling.

    Serve as they are or with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein
    Meal Prep

    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein freeze really well. I keep them in portions of 3-4 in small freezer bags and whenever I want them, I pop them into the air fryer or oven for about 8 minutes, for a juicy and crunchy treat. They are great for breakfast or dessert, and will keep you satisfied for a while.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Looking for a warming fall dinner? Try my Black Garlic Pork Ramen. If you meal prep the Cuban Air Fryer Pork for it, you can also make Pork Banh Mi buns with nearly the same ingredients.

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    A moist and crunchy fall treat, these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have it all: Lots of soft and juicy apples, that get pre-cooked and smothered in cinnamon spiked sourdough-pumpkin puree mix. The Protein powder adds nutrition and sweetness, replacing part of the flour. A cinnamon sugar sprinkling gives an extra crunchy top in contrast to the soft insides.
    Prep Time 45 minutes
    Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
    Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes
    Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine American
    Servings 12
    Calories 189 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 pound firm sweet-tart apples about 5 medium – Roast, take out ¼ cup of the liquid
    • 4 tablespoons honey
    • 1 cup pumpkin puree
    • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
    • 1 cup sourdough starter unfed/discard
    • ½ cup protein powder
    • 3 large eggs at room temperature
    • 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • 3/4 cups fine whole wheat flour
    • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
    • 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon divided, 1 tsp used for cinnamon sugar
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
    • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • 1/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons demerara sugar 2 tbsp used for cinnamon sugar

    Instructions
     

    Start by preparing the roasted apples:

    • Slice the apples thinly, removing the core.
    • Lay baking parchment in an ovenproof dish and stack the sliced apples, drizzling honey between layers.
    • Finish with honey and a drizzle of olive oil.
    • Bake for 1 to 1 hour and 15 minutes, turning the apples every 15 minutes to prevent drying.
    • Once baked, let the apples cool, but do not discard the liquid.
    • When the roasted apples are at room temperature, pour the liquid that has formed into a cup, measuring out ¼ cup.
    • Pick out a few of the slices that look good and put aside, to top the muffins later.

    Prepare the protein powder mixture:

    • In a blender (Nutribullet or similar), combine the eggs, ¼ cup of liquid from the apples, olive oil, vanilla extract, pumpkin puree, apple cider vinegar, protein powder, and, if desired, the sugar and sourdough starter.
    • Blend for about 1 minute until you have a creamy, fluffy mixture.
    • If you don't have a high-speed blender, combine all the ingredients except the olive oil. Mix until creamy, and then slowly drizzle in the olive oil while mixing to emulsify.
    • In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients:
    • Mix the whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg.

    Mix the wet with the dry:

    • Add the creamy protein mixture to the dry ingredients and stir until the flour is just incorporated. Avoid overmixing to prevent tough muffins.
    • Fold the apple slices from the roasted apples into the batter.

    Filling the Muffin Cases:

    • Line your muffin tin with paper muffin cases.
    • If you don't have any, grease the muffin tin with melted butter and a pastry brush, then dust with flour.
    • Use an ice cream scoop or two spoons to fill the muffin cases, about 2/3 full.
    • Top with the remaining apple slices and sprinkle with a mixture of demerara sugar and cinnamon (about 2 tablespoons of sugar with ½ teaspoon of cinnamon).
    • Bake at 175°C (350°F) for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.
    • Let the muffins cool slightly as they will firm up a bit while cooling.
    • Serve the Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein as they are or with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. Enjoy!

    Notes

    Meal Prep
    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein freeze really well. I keep them in portions of 3-4 in small freezer bags and whenever I want them, I pop them into the air fryer or oven for about 8 minutes, for a juicy and crunchy treat.
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 189 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 4 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 27 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 8 grams
    Fiber per Portion: Approximately 2 grams
    Sugar per Portion: Approximately 14 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 297 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 189kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    189
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Breakfast, Easy, fruit, Healthy, Protein, sourdough, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Delicious spiced Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt whiskey which basically makes itself in the pressure cooker. A lovely fall spread for toast, in apple cider donuts or countless other recipes. Making it yourself is cheaper and you can control the amount of sugar that goes into it.

    Why You Want This

    Hard to find in some areas

    With Apple Butter being from the US, I had a hard time finding any around me in Ireland, but I really wanted to make Apple Cider Donuts with it, so what do I do? Make it of course.
    If you are in the same boat, this is for you.

    Apple Butter with Malt

    Cheaper

    Now, I did see “Irish Black Butter” online, which is pretty much apple butter made with cider, but again, none anywhere near me. So homemade it is. Plus, looking at the prices, this stuff is expensive! About 6€ for one small jar! I can sure do it cheaper at home.

    Seasonal

    Apples – With apples being in season, it’s just the right time to make the most of them. I’ve been adding them to all kinds of dishes lately, from Pumpkin Protein Oatmeal with Apple and Salted Caramel Pumpkin Seeds over Sourdough Pumkin Muffins with Apples (coming soon) to the Apple Cider Donuts I made with this and will also be posting during the next few weeks.

    Type of apples: You can use any you have on hand. In Ireland, Bramley apples are used, which is a cooking apple that breaks down entirely. I have used Pink Lady, as it’s my favourite that I always have on hand. They are sweet but crunchy with a nice bit of acidity and easily available in all supermarkets here. Use your favourite. That way you know you’ll love your Apple Butter.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Customizable

    Sweeteners – While I love brown sugar, I prefer a mix of different sweeteners in my cooking, as it adds layers of flavour. I’m replacing half of the brown sugar here with molasses for that deep richness with hints of bitter and maple syrup, which always tastes like fall to me with its caramel undertones.

    Whiskey – I’m also adding a hint of Scottish Malt Whiskey. Talisker to be specific, a long term favourite of mine. Not just for the malt flavour, though, as you probably noticed if you read any of my bread recipes, I’m a big fan of anything malt, but also because it adds that hint of peat smokiness, again as reminder of fall. Considering it has orchard fruit notes itself, it integrates perfectly into this Apple Butter.

    I have seen other versions using bourbon and, as the Irish producer has shown, you clearly could use cider.

    Spices – I have used Pumpkin Spice here, as I had some pre-mixed from previous recipes. If you can’t find it, mix your own. It’s a base of 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/8th tsp clove, ¼ tsp allspice and ¼ tsp nutmeg. Since I live in Ireland, where it’s not easily available in supermarkets, I usually mix a bigger batch and keep it in a little container in my spice cupboard.
    Alternatively you could just use cinnamon.

    Few Ingredients

    The few mentioned above make already the main part of your ingredients. A pinch of salt, a bit of vanilla, though even that is optional, but it rounds the flavour I feel, and that’s already it.

    Very easy

    With the fact that you really don’t need to peel your apples and the pressure cooker doing most of the work for you, this will happily bubble away in the background, while you get on with your day.
    Only in the last 2h, with your cooker open, you’ll need to stir now and then to prevent sticking. But that’s minimal effort.

    The Process

    Apple Preparation

    In short: Remove the core from the apples and roughly chop them. No need to peel.

    For a little more detail: Please wash your apples thoroughly. Most are waxed or otherwise treated and if cooked, all that rather bitter flavour, if left on the skin, will be even more concentrated. Not pleasant! I tend to scrub mine with a bit of dish soap and a sponge under warm water, then rinse thoroughly.

    Back in time, after my grandma showed me how she cored apples, I always thought it’s just so much work! The meticulous carving to get out the core. And I understand why: No wasting of precious apples. But it really stopped me from making more apple recipes.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    These days, I just chop down straight in 4 pieces, leaving the core intact. Then munch the upper and lower bits around it as snack while chopping. That way, I feel nothing gets wasted and I get to snack on apples. Win/win.
    Just chop the apples roughly here, they will cook down anyway and get pureed in the end.

    Pressure Cooker

    I’m using my Sage Fast Slow Pro here, which I got on special for half price years ago. I love it dearly, especially for risotto, which on the hob, with the endless stirring, I plain don’t have the patience to make. (Let me know if you’d like a recipe for that) Again, not affiliated, just what I’m using.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Add the chopped apples, followed by brown sugar, molasses, maple syrup, whiskey (if using), spice, vanilla and a pinch of salt. Stir so all your apple pieces are coated with the sugar-spice mix.
    Close your pressure cooker, set to “High” and 90 minutes.
    Once the time is up, release the pressure (My Sage does that all by itself) and open the lid.

    Stir the now soft apples. They should be half falling apart already, but with a lot of liquid still.
    We’ll be cooking that down to the typical apple butter consistency now.

    With the lid open (or in a pot on the hob, if your cooker doesn’t allow you to use it with the lid open), set your cooker to “Slow Cook”, high for 2h. Stir occasionally, watching the texture. Towards the end of the 2h, most of your liquid should be evaporated and the apples pretty much disintegrated. Once it feels like it’s close to sticking to the bottom of the pot and has reached a consistency you like. It should be thick enough to spread on toast.

    Have a taste. Does it need more spice or sugar? Now is the time to add it and stir it in.

    Pureeing

    This is the step where your apple mash with pieces of peel becomes true Apple Butter.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Let your Apple Butter cool a little in your pressure cooker, so you don’t burn yourself when taking out the pot. Pour all the contents from your pressure into a blender. A food processor or immersion blender works too. Blend until it has a uniform creamy and thick consistency, and no bits of peel are left whole. They should be all pulverized.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Fill into very clean jars that have a lid and let it cool.

    Storing

    Store in the fridge. It should keep for up to 3 months. Or you could freeze it after it has cooled in small freezer bags or containers. That way it’ll last until the next apple season is due, about a year.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Enjoy your Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt on Toast, on my Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein, add to cakes, stir into your oatmeal, the possibilities are endless.

    Apple Butter with Malt

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt

    Delicious spiced Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt whiskey which basically makes itself in the pressure cooker. A lovely fall spread for toast, in apple cider donuts or countless other recipes. Making it yourself is cheaper and you can control the amount of sugar that goes into it.
    Prep Time 10 minutes
    Cook Time 3 hours 30 minutes
    Total Time 3 hours 40 minutes
    Course condiment, Ingredient, spread
    Cuisine American
    Servings 2 cups
    Calories 65 kcal

    Equipment

    • Pressure cooker, Blender

    Ingredients
      

    • 3 lb apples
    • ¼ cup brown sugar
    • 2 tbsp molasses
    • 2 tbsp maple syrup
    • 2 tsp pumpkin spice
    • 2 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1 pinch of salt
    • 1 tbsp single malt whiskey optional

    Instructions
     

    Apple Preparation

    • Wash your apples thoroughly to remove any wax or residue. Chop the apples by cutting straight down around the core, then cut into rough pieces. No need to peel the apples.

    Pressure Cooker

    • Place the chopped apples in your pressure cooker.
    • Add brown sugar, molasses, maple syrup, pumpkin spice, vanilla extract, whiskey (if using) and a pinch of salt. Stir, so all your apple pieces are coated with the sugar-spice mix.
    • Close your pressure cooker, set it to "High" pressure, and cook for 90 minutes.
    • Once the cooking time is up, release the pressure according to your pressure cooker's instructions and open the lid.
    • Stir the softened apples; they should be half falling apart with plenty of liquid.
    • With the lid open (or in a pot on the hob if your cooker doesn't allow open-lid use), set your cooker to "Slow Cook," high for 2 hours.
    • Stir occasionally, monitoring the texture. Toward the end of the 2 hours, most of the liquid should have evaporated, and the apples should have mostly disintegrated.
    • Continue cooking until it's close to sticking to the bottom of the pot and has reached your desired apple butter consistency. It should be thick enough to spread on toast. It will thicken slightly after cooling.
    • Taste and adjust the spice or sugar if needed. Stir in any additional seasoning.

    Pureeing

    • Let your apple butter cool slightly in the pressure cooker to avoid burning yourself.
    • Pour the contents from the pressure cooker into a blender, food processor, or use an immersion blender.
    • Blend until you achieve a uniform creamy and thick consistency, ensuring that no bits of peel remain whole; they should all be pulverized.
    • Fill the apple butter into clean jars with lids and allow it to cool.

    Notes

    Storing
    Store in the fridge. It should keep for up to 3 months. Or you could freeze it after it has cooled in small freezer bags or containers. That way it’ll last until the next apple season is due, about a year.
    Since spreads are difficult to measure in portions, I have assumed 10 portions here, which is probably way too few, if you use it on toast, but too many, if you use it as ingredient. But it gives you a rough idea.
    Calories: Approximately 60-70 calories per serving
    Protein: Negligible
    Fat: Negligible
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 16-18 grams per serving
    Fiber: Approximately 2-3 grams per serving
    Sugars: Approximately 12-14 grams per serving

    Nutrition

    Calories: 65kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Pressure Cooker Apple Butter with Malt
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    65
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, fruit, pressure cooker, vegan
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!