Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein have everything you could possibly want in a muffin: Crunchy, nutty pistachios, a soft and fluffy inside, studded with sweet-tart dried apricots and a crunchy brown sugar sprinkled top. All that with 7g protein per muffin and just 280cal. So you can have a yummy snack with your coffee and feel good about it!

    Why You Want to Make Them

     

    Are you going nuts for Pistachios too?

    I’m honestly hooked recently. I got a big jar of pistachio butter from Bulk and it’s utterly delicious on pretty much everything. I spread it on some rice cakes, topped with blueberries as my evening sweet snack, stirred it in oatmeal with cherries, made Pistachio-Protein Crème Brulee and now these Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein.

    Of course Pistachios aren’t technically nuts, but rather the stone of a fruit, very similar to almonds, which explains their affinity for very similar foods almonds go with. I added some almond essence to these muffins, which underlines the Pistachio flavour rather perfectly.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Speaking of Protein

    If you read a few of the sweet recipes on my blog, you probably noticed that I’m adding protein to many of them. Considering I’m not eating much meat and am not the biggest fan of legumes, so I don’t want to include them into every single meal. Yet, have an acute need to add more protein to my diet, to meet the target for muscle building and/or maintenance, which is at least around 1.2-1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day, I keep looking for ways to increase my intake, without drinking shakes. Why not shakes you ask? They simply bore me.

    I feel if I’m not eating or drinking something that is worth the calories, I’m wasting my time.
    Is it a weird way to see food? Maybe.
    But having lost 70lb taught me, that I’m working on an energy budget per day. Loving food and eating means, I want to spend it well. This does not include the same boring protein shake every day, but rather finding recipes to excite me and have me look forward to eating them.
    That’s where Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein come in: Something I really enjoy eating and am looking forward to, which also adds a nice portion of protein to my day.

    Easy to Make

    If you ever made muffins, you probably loved how easy they are. I know I do. The batter comes together in 10-15 minutes and that includes getting the ingredients out.
    Well…unless your store cupboards are way too full, like mine, and you have to rummage around in them to find stuff. I knew I had dried apricots somewhere! *Empties half her pantry before finding the bag*

    Lower calories than your average Muffin

    Eating an average muffin, according to Google, you are looking at 340-424 calories. That is a fairly big chunk out of your daily budget, if you are watching your weight like I do.
    Having gained a few pounds over Christmas (because I can’t be trusted around sweets), I’m currently trying to get rid of them again. But I really don’t want to go without a sweet treat per day! That would just leave me grumpy and missing something, which in turn means, once I lost the weight I’d go even more for sweets again. Not a good cycle.

    So my solution is, to develop recipes that are sweet, not compromising in flavour, yet lower in calories than the standard versions. This is one of them.
    Oh and I want them to have nutritional value too. High standards for sure.
    These Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein have only 280 calories per muffin, which is a nice bit of saving for one satisfying snack. Or even breakfast if you like.

     

    The Ingredients

    Looking at the typical Pistachio Muffin recipe, I noticed that most are using rather artificial pudding mix to accomplish taste and texture of them. I wanted natural taste though and not use some mix with barely any real pistachio in it.
    That means my muffins aren’t bright green, since they have no colouring either, but instead mostly natural and nutritious ingredients.
    Except the protein powder. Let’s be honest, it isn’t natural, but I feel the benefits outweigh that downside.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein_Ingredients

    Note, these are just some of the ingredients and why I use them, not all, as most are still those of a classic muffin.

    Let’s start with the obvious bit: Pistachio butter. I only replaced half of the butter with it, as nut butter has less fat than butter, which would have meant I needed to add more other fat back in, which wasn’t the idea.

    Keeping half and adding a mix of sour cream and 0% fat Greek yoghurt gave me the moisture content I lost, by swapping part of the butter into Pistachio butter.

    I also reduced both the flour and sugar by adding protein powder. Buttered Popcorn flavoured in this case, though you can easily use vanilla.
    I particularly love MyProtein (not sponsored or affiliated, though I wish it would be, I use it so much!), which adds lovely flavour and sweetness to my recipes, without any weird aftertaste.
    You can safely replace about ¼ of the flour in a recipe with it, without any negative impact. Use more, and the results might be drier than intended.

    I’m still using a mix of white and brown sugar, but less than usual, to keep the structure needed. The sugar mixed with the sweetener from the protein powder also means it still tastes just naturally sweet.

    While looking into the secrets of Pistachio muffins, I found the pudding powder not only adds flavour and sweetness, but also a bit of cornflour, which will thicken the pudding, but add a lovely softness to muffin batter. So I replaced some of the flour with cornflour to achieve the same effect.

    Nutrition and flavour wise, I prefer a mix of white flour for lightness and the typical muffin feel and whole wheat flour for some nutty flavour. If you can find it, use fine whole wheat flour, which is great for lighter pastry.

    For even more flavour, I’m using a bit of almond extract, which is in the same flavour family as pistachio, making it a natural choice. Unless you have natural pistachio extract, which would be a fantastic replacement. But I couldn’t find any in my local supermarkets and wasn’t keen on ordering just for this recipe. Though…it’s in my head now, I still might. Has anyone tried it? What were your thoughts?

    To reduce the sugar and up the fruit content, I swapped out 2 eggs for 2 bananas. You can choose to use just eggs for more protein but add a little more sugar.

    For the add-ins I’m using dried apricots, as they are not adding a lot of additional water, which I’d have to account for if I’d be using fresh ones. But, since I found some fresh apricots at Tesco, I decided to add half a fruit on top of each muffin, which gave them an amazing fruity-fresh kick I loved.
    They are purely optional though.

    Also some chopped pistachios for extra crunch and more pistachio flavour.

    Each muffin got a little sprinkling of demerara sugar on top, adding some sparkle, crunch, and sweetness, making the muffins extra special.

     

    The Process

    The one thing that makes all baking easier is, to have all the ingredients at room temperature. If you have fridge cold butter, it’s much harder to mix it with the sugar. Just melted however, will give you a greasy result.
    Similar for the eggs, which, when cold, can lead to a curdled result while mixing into the soft butter.
    So plan a little bit ahead by taking everything out of the fridge an hour or so before you plan to make your muffins.

    Preheat your oven to 425°F/220°C and line a muffin tin with muffin cases. Or grease it thoroughly if you prefer. Personally I find muffin cases much easier to remove and they leave less to clean, which is always a plus in my book.

    If you have 2 muffin tins, you’ll need both. Otherwise you might bake in 2 batches, as this recipe makes about 16 large muffins.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein_Process

    From there on it’s as easy as mixing the butter with the sugar until fluffy and white. Then, one by one, whisk the eggs and mashed bananas in until well incorporated.
    Add the protein powder with the remaining wet ingredients, to make sure you have no protein lumps in your Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein_Process

    Now mix your dry ingredients, keeping back about 1-2 tbsp of the chopped pistachios for sprinkling on top, and add most of them to your batter. But not all. Keep a few tablespoons of the flour mix back, to coat the chopped apricots in. This is to prevent them from sinking to the bottom.

    Gently fold your dry ingredients into the wet until just combined. A few lumps are fine. Don’t overmix, or your muffins will be tough from the gluten you developed.
    Then add the flour coated apricots and fold them in too.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein_Process

    Divide the batter between the muffin molds, filling them all the way, so you get nice and high tops. I use an ice cream scoop for this, to make it very easy. Two tablespoons work too.

    Sprinkle with the remaining chopped pistachios, lay a sliced fresh apricot half on top, if using, then sprinkle lightly with demerara sugar.

    Now you might have looked at the high oven temperature and thought it might be a typo. It’s not. The high initial temperature is what gives you the beautiful high muffin tops, but it will be lowered after 5-7 minutes of baking, to the classic 350°F/175°C, to bake for another 15-17 minutes, depending on your oven.
    Just don’t open the oven door, except once, around half of the baking time, to turn your muffin tin, should your oven bake unevenly.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Your Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein are ready when the top is golden brown and toothpick comes out mostly clean, a few crumbs are ok.

    Let them cool in the tin for about 10 minutes, then take them out onto a wire rack.

    Enjoy your fluffy, tangy, and crunchy Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein with a nice cup of coffee or tea. They are also really good for breakfast.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Storing your Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    The muffins keep well in a tin or box for about 3 days.
    They also freeze very well. I usually place most in freezer proof containers or small freezer bags and just air fry them for about 7 minutes when I want one. They taste like fresh!

    If you liked this recipe, try my Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    These delicious Sourdough Brownies with Protein

    Or a super easy Cherry Peach Clafoutis with Protein

     

    Please Comment

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein have everything could possibly want in a muffin: Crunchy, nutty pistachios, a soft and fluffy inside, studded with sweet-tart dried apricots and a crunchy brown sugar sprinkled top. All that with 7g protein per muffin and just 280cal. So you can have a yummy snack with your coffee and feel good about it!
    Prep Time 15 minutes
    Cook Time 20 minutes
    Total Time 35 minutes
    Course Breakfast, Cake, Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine American
    Servings 16
    Calories 299 kcal

    Equipment

    • Muffin Tin

    Ingredients
      

    • ½ cup butter + 2 tbsp
    • ½ cup pistachio butter
    • 1/3 cup white sugar
    • 1/3 cup brown sugar
    • 1 cup sour cream
    • ½ cup 0% fat Greek yoghurt
    • 2 tsp vanilla
    • 1 tbsp almond extract
    • ¾ cup protein powder
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 ripe bananas mashed
    • 1 cup white flour
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    • 4 tbsp cornflour
    • 4 tsp baking powder
    • 2 tsp kosher salt
    • 1 cup dried apricots chopped roughly
    • ½ cup chopped pistachios 1-2 tbsp kept for sprinkling on top
    • 1 tbsp demerara sugar for sprinkling
    • 8 fresh apricots for topping optional but delicious

    Instructions
     

    • Ensure all ingredients are at room temperature for easier mixing. Preheat the oven to 425°F/220°C. Line a muffin tin with cases or grease it.
    • In a large bowl, cream together ½ cup + 2tbsp softened butter, pistachio butter, white sugar, and brown sugar until fluffy and white.
    • Whisk in the eggs and mashed bananas, one at a time, until well incorporated. Add sour cream, Greek yogurt, vanilla extract, and almond extract. Mix until smooth.
    • Combine the protein powder with the remaining wet ingredients to avoid lumps. Mix until well incorporated.
    • In a separate bowl, mix the white flour, whole wheat flour, cornflour, baking powder, and kosher salt. Reserve 1-2 tbsp of the flour mix to coat the chopped dried apricots and 1-2 tbsp chopped pistachios for topping the muffins.
    • Add most of the dry ingredients to the wet mixture and gently fold until just combined.
    • Toss the chopped dried apricots in the reserved flour mixture to prevent sinking. Fold them into the batter.
    • Divide the batter evenly among the muffin cases, filling them to the top. Use an ice cream scoop or two tablespoons for ease. Sprinkle the remaining chopped pistachios on top. Optionally, place a fresh apricot half, cut in slices on each muffin and sprinkle with demerara sugar.
    • Bake in the preheated oven for 5-7 minutes at 425°F/220°C, then reduce the temperature to 350°F/175°C and bake for an additional 15-17 minutes or until the tops are golden brown and a toothpick comes out mostly clean.
    • Allow the muffins to cool in the tin for about 10 minutes, then transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.
    • Serve and enjoy your fluffy, tangy, and crunchy Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein with a cup of coffee or tea. They make a lovely breakfast treat too.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 299kcalCarbohydrates: 37gProtein: 10gFat: 13gSaturated Fat: 6gPolyunsaturated Fat: 2gMonounsaturated Fat: 4gTrans Fat: 0.2gCholesterol: 53mgSodium: 467mgPotassium: 369mgFiber: 3gSugar: 20gVitamin A: 982IUVitamin C: 4mgCalcium: 121mgIron: 2mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    299
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    13
    g
    20
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    6
    g
    38
    %
    Trans Fat
     
    0.2
    g
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    2
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    4
    g
    Cholesterol
     
    53
    mg
    18
    %
    Sodium
     
    467
    mg
    20
    %
    Potassium
     
    369
    mg
    11
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    37
    g
    12
    %
    Fiber
     
    3
    g
    13
    %
    Sugar
     
    20
    g
    22
    %
    Protein
     
    10
    g
    20
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    982
    IU
    20
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    4
    mg
    5
    %
    Calcium
     
    121
    mg
    12
    %
    Iron
     
    2
    mg
    11
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, For Guests, Healthy, Protein, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds taste like German Christmas Market, but have a smooth instead of bumpy caramel, with deep and rich caramel flavour. They form beautiful, shiny clusters of cinnamon-spice crunchiness, that are great for snacking, gifting or even topping your morning oatmeal with.

    Don’t be scared of making caramel! It just takes a few minutes of patience.

     

    Why You Want to Make Them

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Reminds you of German Christmas Markets

    If you ever visited a German Christmas market and loved the smell of it, these are a big part of what wafted through the air. Often just made with cinnamon and sugar, caramelised, and formed into nubbly crusted almonds by stirring constantly and stopping at the just right point, they are at the heart of every visit.

    But that bumpy crust is also the tricky part, as you need to catch the exact moment between sugar crystals and caramel, to achieve it. Also, I tend to find it not particularly kind to my teeth, as it’s a rather thick and hard layer. And more sugar than caramel flavour.
    So I changed my technique a little, to still give you the spicy, Christmassy flavour and scent, but a shiny and dark caramel with a bit more flavour to it.

    Great Gift

    The smoother caramel has another advantage over the classic Christmas Market almonds: It keeps longer. Usually the Candied almonds you’d buy on the market are a sticky mess the day after. These Caramelized Spiced Almonds can be kept in an airtight container for over a week. Which makes them a great gift to make ahead. And aren’t homemade, edible gifts the best ones anyway?

    Doesn’t take long

    These Caramelized Spiced Almonds take just about 10-15 minutes to make and aren’t hard by any means. 4 ingredients (I count the spice mix as one. Plus you could, if you wanted, just use cinnamon) and a few minutes of melting sugar are all they take.

     

    The Ingredients

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds_Ingredients

    Almonds – For the most traditional treat you’ll need almonds. Ideally with their skin, as the caramel will adhere better than to skinned ones. Plus they keep more of their nutritional value.
    I know…it’s a treat, but still, we can mix the delicious with the good for us!

    You could use all sorts of other nuts and seeds you enjoy here too. I love cashews or macadamias, but even sunflower or pumpkin seeds work amazingly well.

    Sugar – I’ve used soft brown sugar here, for it’s higher molasses content, resulting in an even deeper caramel flavour. Caster sugar would be more traditional, as it melts faster due to the size of the grains.

    Spices – I’m using a mix of cinnamon, allspice, cloves, ground ginger and nutmeg here. Balanced with a pinch of salt. And some vanilla extract. You could use just cinnamon, and they will still be utterly delicious.

    And that’s already it.

     

    The Process

    Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

    Essentially you add the sugar and spices with a bit of water to a pan, let them come to a boil, then add the almonds.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds_Process

    Let it bubble away for a while, stirring now and then, until the water has evaporated, and the sugar crystallizes again. This is working as intended.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds_Process

    Now leave it on slightly lower heat, until the sugar begins to melt again. Gently fold over the almonds. Then leave to melt further. Be patient and wait until all the sugar is liquidized and transforming into a dark and shiny caramel. Stir again, so all almonds are coated evenly.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds_Process

    Once it has reached the desired darkness without burning, carefully pour the mass onto your parchment lined baking sheet and spread it out with a spatula. My ideal shape is mostly one layer of almonds with the occasional overlap. But arrange them however you enjoy them.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds_Process
    Be quick and careful though, the caramel is very hot and firms up quickly.

    Let them cool entirely until crunchy and hard. Then break into smaller pieces and store in an airtight container for up to a week. The almonds will still be delicious after, but the caramel might start to soften a little and not look as shiny anymore.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Looking for more Christmas recipes?

    Try my Cranberry Rosemary Roasted Chicken for a delicious and easy dinner. Or Sourdough Brioche Feuilltee, for an impressive breakfast that you can prepare ahead.

    Please Comment

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds

    Caramelized Spiced Almonds taste like German Christmas Market, but have a smooth instead of bumpy caramel, with deep and rich caramel flavour. They form beautiful, shiny clusters of cinnamon-spice crunchiness, that are great for snacking, gifting or even topping your morning oatmeal with. Don’t be scared of making caramel! It just takes a few minutes of patience.
    Prep Time 2 minutes
    Cook Time 15 minutes
    Total Time 17 minutes
    Course Dessert, Ingredient, Snack
    Cuisine German
    Servings 10
    Calories 160 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 cup soft brown sugar
    • ½ cup water
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
    • ¼ tsp each ground allspice nutmeg, ginger
    • 1/8 tsp ground clove
    • 1 pinch salt
    • 1 ¼ cup raw almonds

    Instructions
     

    Prepare Baking Sheet:

    • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.

    Create Caramel Mixture:

    • In a large, heavy-bottomed pan, combine the soft brown sugar, water, vanilla extract, ground cinnamon, ground allspice, ground nutmeg, ground ginger, ground clove, and a pinch of salt.

    Bring to a Boil:

    • Over medium heat, bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Allow it to bubble for a few minutes until the water has mostly evaporated, and the sugar starts to crystallize.

    Add Almonds:

    • Gently stir in the raw almonds, ensuring they are well-coated with the crystallized sugar mixture.

    Continue Cooking:

    • Let the almonds and sugar mixture cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally. The sugar will re-melt and caramelize, creating a dark and shiny coating on the almonds. Be patient during this process.

    Spread on Baking Sheet:

    • Once the caramel has reached the desired darkness without burning, quickly and carefully pour the almond mixture onto the prepared parchment-lined baking sheet. Use a spatula to spread it out, arranging the almonds into a mostly single layer with occasional overlaps.

    Cool Completely:

    • Allow the caramelized almonds to cool completely on the baking sheet. The caramel will harden, resulting in a crunchy texture.

    Break into Pieces:

    • Once fully cooled and hardened, break the caramelized almond mass into smaller, bite-sized pieces. Be cautious, as the caramel will be very hot.

    Notes

    Store:
    Store the caramelized spiced almonds in an airtight container for up to a week. While the almonds will remain delicious, note that the caramel may soften slightly and lose its shine over time. Enjoy your homemade treat!
    10 portions
    Calories: Approximately 160 calories
    Protein: Approximately 4 grams
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 18 grams
    Fat: Approximately 9 grams
    Fiber: Approximately 2 grams
    Please note that these values are approximate and can vary based on specific brands and variations in ingredient measurements.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 160kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Caramelized Spiced Almonds
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    160
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, High Fibre, Protein, vegan
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Super soft and fluffy, flavourful Sourdough Discard Naan breads, that are both easy to make and good for you due to the benefits of sourdough. The ingredients will probably already be in your store cupboard or fridge. These are incredibly versatile to use as flatbread recipe for all kinds of meals, including the Falafel Wraps I created them for, a quick pizza or to brush with garlic butter and enjoy them with a curry.

    Why You Want to Make These

     

    Flavour

    Have you ever bought Naan bread in the supermarket, but after trying fresh Naan in an Indian restaurant, you feel they always fall short on the flavour and texture front? Yeah, me too.
    I absolutely loved the super soft and fluffy flatbreads at an Indian place and nearly enjoyed them more than the Chicken Korma they came with. To me, Bread is a main part of a meal and I’d like it to be utterly delicious.

    That’s why I make pretty much all of my bread at home. Being German and used to really good bread straight from the bakery around the corner, I always felt standard yeast bread doesn’t entirely live up to what I enjoy. After moving to Ireland, I realised that the lack of flavour was due to the fact that most breads in Germany include sourdough, which gives them a distinct gentle to strong tang, and layers of flavour, depending on how long you allow it to ferment before baking. After that realisation I started trying different recipes using it, including sweet baked goods with great success.

    This Sourdough Discard Naan is no exception. Starting with a yeast based recipe from one of my all-time favourite blogs “Half Baked Harvest”, I modified it to include sourdough as it’s main raising ingredient and for flavour and am absolutely delighted with the results. Soft, fluffy, easy to wrap around anything you might decide to roll into them, with a very gentle tang from said sourdough, these are absolutely everything I want from bread.

     

    Sourdough

    A word on sourdough, which might sound familiar if you read my recipe for German Sourdough Rye Beer Dutch Oven Bread, so you could skip ahead if you did.

    Sourdough and long rising time make the bread very easy digestible, which is especially helpful for those of you that have a gluten sensitivity. Sourdough bread is known to have a much slower release of sugar, not spiking insulin as fast compared to white bread made with yeast or from the supermarket, meaning even diabetics can eat it (within reason).
    It’s great if you are on a diet and don’t want to give up bread, as it’s very nutritious and makes you feel full longer.

    It’s also very flexible and versatile when it comes generally to baked goods, so I use it in everything from bread to even brownies, as it adds so much in terms of flavour.

    Flexible

    The fact that the sourdough gets better with a slower rise and is happy to wait for you in the fridge for up to 48 hours makes these Sourdough Discard Naan breads incredibly flexible for meal prep or a family feast you are planning. You can do everything in advance except the frying of the bread.
    Though I found that they keep really well in a bread tin, to be re-heated for a few seconds in the microwave when you want to enjoy them. So even that would be an option, to relax on workdays or when your guests are around.

    Versatile

    Sourdough Naan is a fantastic side not just for Indian curries, but pretty much everything that goes with soft and fluffy flatbread. That can be a stew, to mop up the juices, Falafel Wraps (Recipe coming soon) or even as a base for a super quick weekday pizza. Or of course very classic brushed with garlic butter, which makes them pretty irresistible.

    You can use either these Sourdough Discard Naan or my Sourdough Flatbread with Feta in the upcoming Mezze Feast, depending on your preference and if you’d like to create wraps with Falafels or not.

    The Ingredients

    Besides the above mentioned Sourdough starter, you’ll need flour. I used a mix of plain white flour and whole wheat, to add some nutrition and nutty flavour.
    You can use all plain white or bread flour here, for even softer, chewier Naans.
    Even though I read that traditional Naan back in time was made with only whole wheat flour, I wouldn’t advise it, if you want to wrap anything into the flatbreads, as it tends to give a little firmer consistency.

    Milk

    I’m using Oat milk here, as I’m lactose intolerant, but you can use any kind of full fat milk. The fat content adds to the softness, which is why I’m not using unsweetened Almond milk or similar, to not change the consistency.

    Butter

    Butter gives these Naan breads their incredible softness and adds a lovely moisture to the dough. Plus of course flavour. I’m not using much, 4 tbsp are enough to give the desired effect.
    You could use olive or neutral oil instead if you are vegan or rather avoid butter.

    Greek Yoghurt

    Greek Yoghurt, similar to the butter, adds to the softness and moisture of the bread and is essential to get the super pliable bread I’m aiming for. Full fat in this case, as that will help with all 3 of the above characteristics.

    Yeast

    In theory you wouldn’t need yeast here if you want to let the sourdough do it’s thing overnight. But I added it as I was in a bit of a hurry and wanted to eat the bread on the same day. The rise was rather fast and lively with yeast, so you can probably even leave it out if you prepare the dough early morning for dinner.

    Baking Powder and Baking Soda

    Similar to the yeast, but with even quicker rising abilities, you can give your Naan Bread a boost by adding these, if you have, say, only a few hours until you want to eat.

    I ended up leaving them out, as they lose their functionality when left for a longer fermentation, which is what I usually aim for with sourdough. Just know it’s an option for getting fluffy Naan if you are in a hurry.

    Honey

    I’m using a little honey here to feed the yeast, which loves a little sweetness to wake up. Also to balance the tang from the sourdough.
    You could use sugar instead, if you prefer.

    Salt

    One of the main differentiating ingredients between bland bread and really good bread is salt. Not much, but enough to give it some flavour. Just don’t mix it with the yeast at the start, as yeast will die immediately when touching salt. Instead mix it into the flour, so it’s less concentrated before coming in contact.
    I’m using Kosher salt here, as pretty much always, because it gives me more control over the seasoning. If you use sea salt, use half of the given amount.

    The Process

     

    The Wet

    Warm the milk in the microwave or in a pot for a moment, just to get it lukewarm and add the warm water. It should just feel very slightly warm to the touch and comfortable on the skin. Mix in the yeast and honey and let it stand for about 10 minutes, to activate the yeast. If you see some bubbles appearing after that time, your yeast is alive and will do its job. If not, it’s too old and won’t add any rise to your bread. If you have used your yeast recently and know it’s still fresh, you can skip this step and add milk, water and yeast together with the other wet ingredients.

    Melt the Butter and let it cool to lukewarm or room temperature, so it doesn’t kill the yeast or sourdough on contact.

    The Dry

    Add first the flour, salt, baking powder and soda (if using) to a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer. Give the dry ingredients a good mix, to disperse the salt.

    Add the remaining ingredients and mix briefly with a spoon. If your stand mixer manages to catch the flour from the sides easily, you can skip the spoon step. I noticed mine does a better job when I briefly pre-mix.

    Kneading

    Knead the dough on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes or until very smooth and elastic. To check if it’s ready and has developed enough gluten, perform the windowpane test.

    The dough should at this point be smooth and reasonably easy to work with, but slightly sticky, which will change after it had time to rise. If you feel it’s too sticky, add a little flour at a time.

    Shape into a smooth ball with your hands and put into a lightly oiled bowl. I often simply use the cleaned bowl of my stand mixer, as it has a lid attached, so I can let the dough rise at room temperature. If keeping it in the fridge overnight, I love a Tupperware bowl designed specifically for yeasted doughs, as the lid “plops” open once the dough has risen enough.

    Shaping

    Once your dough has risen to about double its size or, if you had it in the fridge, the next day, divide it into 8 equal pieces.Take each piece form it into a round bun.

    At this point you can either roll them out right away or store in the fridge or freezer for another day.
    I often store a few unbaked ones in my freezer, as they take only a few hours to thaw, so I can have homemade fresh Naan anytime.

    Once you want to fry your Naan bread (which will take about 2-4 minutes per portion), lightly flour your work surface. Use either lightly floured rolling pin or, if you have one, a tortilla press lined with a cut open freezer bag, to get your Naan bread into shape.

    You can aim either for an oval or round. They should be relatively thin without ripping. About ¼ inch thick is a good guideline. A tortilla press will achieve a pretty decent even round shape, while rolling pins tend to produce something more oval. But then, these are Naan breads and homemade, they are not supposed to look perfect.

    Frying

    Get a frying pan you have a lid for really hot on medium-high heat. Add a small bit of olive oil and rub it around the pan carefully with a bunched up paper towel, so you don’t burn yourself.

    Add a rolled out Naan bread to the pan and cover with the lid immediately. This is where the magic happens.You’ll see the characteristic big bubbles appearing after about 1 minute.


    Flip the bread and cook uncovered for another minute or two, until the bubbles on the now underside show golden browning.

    To keep these really soft and pliable, I used a trick I learned from a friend: Take one large plate, cover with a clean kitchen towel, add the fried Sourdough Naan and wrap it with the towel, then cover with another large plate that is turned upside down. This will keep the steam and moisture inside, meaning your bread will be perfectly soft and warm until you are done frying.

    Serving

    If you’d like to brush them with garlic butter (I didn’t, since I made them for Falafel wraps), do so ideally right after frying and sprinkle with a few chopped herbs, such as Cilantro, if you like.

    Enjoy your super soft and fluffy Sourdough Discard Naan in any way you like.

     

    Meal Prep

    The fact that the sourdough can be kept in the fridge for up to 2 days allows for easy planning around mealtimes and days. The flavour only gets better during that time.

    As mentioned above, you can freeze the divided dough in portions. Either in freezer bags or a freezer proof container.
    Alternatively roll them out and store between layers of baking parchment and freeze like that, which allows for even quicker use.

    Or, as last variant to freeze, fry all and freeze some of the readily fried ones in freezer bags once cooled, to always have a super quick homemade bread or pizza option.

    Without freezing, these Naan Breads keep in an airtight container for about 3-4 days. Re-heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. I did this in a special tortilla warmer than can go into the microwave, which gave me absolutely brilliant results. I got the warmer together with my tortilla press as an added benefit.

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    The Mezze Feast

    Here are the recipes posted for the Mezze Feast so far. Mix and match whatever you like, use just one as super quick snack or dinner or all of them for one stunning feast.
    Use either these Sourdough Discard Naans or the Sourdough Flatbread with Feta as your bread for it.

    Hummus Two Ways

    Easy Tzatziki

    Muhammara

    Smoked Aubergine Dip

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Naan

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Super soft and fluffy, flavourful Sourdough Naan breads, that are both easy to make and good for you due to the benefits of sourdough. The ingredients will probably already be in your store cupboard or fridge and the hands on time is just minutes. These are incredibly versatile to use as flatbread recipe for all kinds of recipes, including the Falafel Wraps I made them for. Or to brush with garlic butter and enjoy them with a curry.
    Prep Time 20 minutes
    Cook Time 20 minutes
    Resting time 2 hours
    Total Time 2 hours 40 minutes
    Course Appetizer, Bread, Ingredient, Side Dish, Snack
    Cuisine Indian
    Servings 8
    Calories 309 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • ½ cup oat milk or any full fat milk of your choice
    • ¼ cup warm water
    • 1 tbsp honey
    • ½ tsp active dry yeast
    • 1 cup full fat Greek yoghurt
    • 1 cup sourdough starter active or discard
    • 2.5 cups plain white flour
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour ideally fine
    • ½ tsp kosher salt half if using sea salt
    • 4 tbsp butter melted and cooled to room temperature

    If you want to fry your Sourdough Naan within 1-2h:

    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp baking soda

    Instructions
     

    • Warm the milk in the microwave or in a pot until it's lukewarm. Add the warm water. It should feel slightly warm to the touch and comfortable on the skin. Mix in the yeast and honey and let it stand for about 10 minutes to activate the yeast. If you see bubbles forming, your yeast is alive and active.
    • Melt the butter and let it cool to lukewarm or room temperature to avoid killing the yeast or sourdough.
    • In a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, add the white flour, whole wheat flour, salt, and optional baking powder and soda (if using). Mix the dry ingredients to disperse the salt evenly.
    • Add the remaining ingredients, including the yeast mixture and melted butter. Mix briefly with a spoon or in your stand mixer. If your stand mixer easily catches the flour from the sides, you can skip the initial spoon mixing.
    • Knead the dough on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes or until it becomes very smooth and elastic. To check if it's ready and has developed enough gluten, perform the windowpane test.
    • The dough should be smooth and slightly sticky at this point, but it will become easier to work with as it rises. If it feels too sticky, add a little flour at a time.
    • Shape the dough into a smooth ball with your hands and place it in a lightly oiled bowl for rising. You can use the bowl of your stand mixer or a suitable container with a lid. Let the dough rise at room temperature until it doubles in size. If you plan to refrigerate it overnight, use a large container, as the dough may expand significantly.
    • Once the dough has doubled in size, or the next day if refrigerated, divide it into 8 equal pieces. Take each piece and tuck the edges underneath to form a round bun with a smooth surface.
    • You can choose to roll them out immediately or store them in the fridge or freezer for later use. Frozen naan can be thawed in just a few hours for fresh naan anytime.
    • When you're ready to fry your naan bread, lightly flour your work surface. Use a lightly floured rolling pin or a tortilla press lined with a cut-open freezer bag to shape the naan. Aim for a relatively thin, oval or round shape, about ¼ inch thick.
    • Heat a frying pan with a lid on medium-high heat. Add a small amount of olive oil and rub it around the pan with a bunched-up paper towel.
    • Place a rolled-out naan in the pan and cover it with the lid immediately. Bubbles should start appearing after about 1 minute.
    • Flip the naan and cook uncovered for another 1-2 minutes until the underside shows golden browning and is cooked through.
    • To keep the naan soft and pliable, stack them between two large plates covered with a clean kitchen towel. This will help retain the steam and moisture, keeping the naan warm and soft until you're done frying.
    • If desired, brush the naan with garlic butter and sprinkle with chopped herbs, such as cilantro, right after frying.
    • Your homemade sourdough discard naan is now ready to be enjoyed!

    Notes

    Without freezing, these Naan Breads keep in an airtight container for about 3-4 days. Re-heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. I did this in a special tortilla warmer than can go into the microwave, which gave me absolutely brilliant results.
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 309 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 9 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 53 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 6 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 193 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 309kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Discard Naan
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    309
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, meal prep, sourdough, Vegetarian, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh is a super creamy spread made from strained Greek yoghurt with mild and caramelized roasted garlic and zesty lemon, rounded with some lemony sumac.
    Super quick to make, healthy and with lots of protein, this will become a favourite side dish for sure. If with the Mezze Feast or on its own, you will fall in love with it.

     

    Why You Want to Make This

    Easy

    I know I say this a lot, especially with the recipes for dips, but this one takes basically 5 minutes of active work and a little time in the fridge for the yoghurt and the garlic in the oven or air fryer. After that it’s just a matter of mashing everything together with a fork and you have a delicious spread ready.

    Healthy

    Greek Yoghurt provides protein with all the benefits that come with it and healthy bacteria that help your gut. With the water reduced, it’s a pretty concentrated form of both, which I love.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Versatile

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh can be used as spread or dip, to go with a Mezze Feast, which is what I was doing. You could top it with roasted cherry tomatoes or mix it with different seasonings. Za’atar would be a classic, but try adding something hot, like harissa or different herbs. Maybe some chopped olives or roasted peppers and within minutes you have a completely different tasting side dish.

     

    The Ingredients

    Full fat Greek yoghurt is the main ingredient for Labneh. Be sure not to use 0% fat, as it will taste rather floury when strained. You want it creamy. I’m using Glenisk, which is widely available in Ireland and I just love the flavour. Make sure to use a type of Greek yoghurt you generally enjoy eating, since the flavour will intensify when the water is reduced.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Salt

    Both for flavour and quicker removal of the water content, the yoghurt gets mixed with salt. I’m using kosher salt here. If you are using sea salt, half the amount.

    Garlic

    A whole bulb of it for that matter. It will be roasted and caramelized in the oven or air fryer, so no need to be scared of garlic breath. This process also softens it and completely transforms the flavour.
    Since I’ve tried it many years ago for the first time, I’m completely hooked. I usually make several bulbs while I’m at it and store them in the fridge, to use in various ways during the week. Sometime simply spread on toast, with a hint of Maldon salt is heaven. Or on roasted chicken with some cherry tomatoes roasted alongside.

    Lemon

    We are using only the zest here, as the intention is only to add flavour, not liquid back in. Use an unwaxed and untreated lemon or wash thoroughly under hot water first.

    Sumac

    Sumac is a red, lemony tasting spice made from ground berries from the middle east. I absolutely love it in anything that needs a lemony hit or some pretty pink colour. It’s often added to Za’atar and used to sprinkle on top of all sorts of dishes like hummus or Labneh, stews, salads and more. Once you’ve tried it, you’ll use it everywhere.
    It’s widely available in supermarkets these days. But if you can’t find it, you can leave it out or add more lemon zest.

     

    The Process

    Straining the Yoghurt

    Usually this is done in a cheese cloth (or clean kitchen towel), tied to the handle of a wooden spoon, which is rested over a container high enough to allow the liquid to drip out of the yoghurt and left in the fridge overnight.

    Labneh
    However, I read of a method using a coffee filter and since I had my Chemex around, I figured it would be a great use. https://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/eight-cup-handblown-series-glass-coffeemaker.html
    You can use either the towel method or any type of filter coffee device. I honestly loved the ease of it and the fact that I didn’t have to clean the yoghurt of the towel afterwards. Just take it out of the paper coffee filter and you are done. Minimal cleanup.

    Labneh

    To strain the yoghurt, first mix it with the salt, then add it either to your cheese cloth, towel or coffee filter, set it over a bowl and cover the top with cling film if you are using the filter method. Leave in the fridge for minimum 6h or overnight.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Once it has reached a very firm and creamy consistency and you see a fair bit of fluid has dripped out, take the labneh out of your chosen straining device and add to a bowl.

    Garlic

    Pre-heat your air fryer or oven to 400°F/200°C

    Cut the very top off your bulb of garlic, just so the cloves are visible. Leave the rest unpeeled. Drizzle with a tiny bit of olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Wrap into a piece of kitchen foil and twist to close.
    Add to the oven for 40-60 minutes or the air fryer for 20-30 minutes or until the cloves are soft and caramelized. This might take a little longer or shorter, depending on the size and freshness of your head of garlic.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Be careful when taking out and opening, as the little parcel will be very hot. Let it cool down, until easy to handle. Squish the now soft garlic cloves out of the papery skin into a little bowl and smash with a fork until you have a puree.

    Assembly

    Add the smashed, roasted garlic, lemon zest and sumac to your labneh and mix thoroughly with a fork.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Taste and adjust the seasoning to your preferences.

    Enjoy with warm flat bread, crudites, on toast or with anything savoury you might usually eat with cream cheese.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Meal Prep

    Since this is simply strained Greek yoghurt with roasted garlic, this should keep for about 1 week in an airtight container in the fridge.
    I often make this on my weekend, to have a snack with some fresh cherry tomatoes on sourdough toast for the week, as it keeps so well.

    And since it mostly makes itself, you can start the preparation the day before you want it and just have 5 minutes of assembly on the day.

    The Mezze Feast

    Here are the recipes posted for the Mezze Feast so far. Mix and match whatever you like, use just one as super quick snack or dinner or all of them for one stunning feast:

    Hummus Two Ways

    Easy Tzatziki

    Muhammara

    Smoked Aubergine Dip

     

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh is a super creamy spread made from strained Greek yoghurt with mild and caramelized roasted garlic and zesty lemon, rounded with some lemony sumac. Super quick to make, healthy and with lots of protein, this will become a favourite side dish for sure. If with the Mezze Feast or on its own, you will fall in love with it.
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Cook Time 40 minutes
    Straining time 6 hours
    Total Time 6 hours 45 minutes
    Course Appetizer, condiment, dip, spread
    Cuisine Middle Eastern
    Servings 8
    Calories 133 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 2 cups Greek yoghurt full fat
    • ½ tsp salt

    For the Roasted Garlic Lemon version:

    • 1 bulb garlic
    • 1 lemon zested
    • 1 tsp sumac

    Instructions
     

    Straining the Yogurt:

    • In a mixing bowl, combine the Greek yogurt and salt. Stir well to evenly distribute the salt throughout the yogurt.

    Choose your preferred straining method:

    • a. Cheese Cloth/Towel Method: Use a clean cheesecloth or kitchen towel and tie it to the handle of a wooden spoon. Place this over a container that's high enough to allow the liquid to drain out of the yogurt. Let it rest in the fridge overnight.
    • b. Coffee Filter Method: If using a coffee filter, like a Chemex coffee maker, place the yogurt with salt in the filter. Set it over a bowl and cover the top with cling film. Leave it in the fridge for a minimum of 6 hours or overnight.
    • Once the yogurt has achieved a very firm and creamy consistency, and you see a significant amount of liquid has dripped out, remove the labneh from your chosen straining device and transfer it to a bowl.

    Roasted Garlic:

    • Preheat your air fryer or oven to 400°F/200°C.
    • Cut the very top off the bulb of garlic, exposing the cloves but leaving the rest unpeeled. Drizzle a small amount of olive oil over the garlic and sprinkle with salt. Wrap the garlic in a piece of kitchen foil and twist to seal it.
    • Roast the garlic in the oven for 40-60 minutes or in the air fryer for 20-30 minutes, or until the cloves are soft and caramelized. The exact time may vary depending on the size and freshness of your garlic.
    • Be cautious when removing and opening the foil packet, as it will be very hot. Allow the roasted garlic to cool down until it's easy to handle.
    • Squeeze the now soft garlic cloves out of the papery skin into a small bowl. Mash them with a fork until you have a smooth puree.

    Assembly:

    • Add the mashed, roasted garlic, lemon zest, and sumac to the strained labneh in the bowl.
    • Mix the ingredients thoroughly with a fork, ensuring the roasted garlic, lemon zest, and sumac are evenly distributed throughout the labneh.
    • Taste the labneh and adjust the seasoning to your preferences. You can add more salt or lemon zest if needed.
    • Enjoy your Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh with warm flatbread, fresh vegetables (crudites), on toast, or with any savoury accompaniments you typically enjoy with cream cheese. This creamy, tangy, and subtly sweet dip is sure to be a crowd-pleaser.

    Notes

    Meal Prep
    Since this is simply strained Greek yoghurt with roasted garlic, this should keep for about 1 week in an airtight container in the fridge.
    I often make this on my weekend, to have a snack with some fresh cherry tomatoes on sourdough toast for the week, as it keeps so well.
    And since it mostly makes itself, you can start the preparation the day before you want it and just have 5 minutes of assembly on the day.
    8 portions
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 133 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 9 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 4 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 9 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 175 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 133kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    133
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, For Guests, Healthy, High Protein, meal prep, Protein, Vegetarian, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Soft and fluffy Sourdough Flatbread with Feta hits the spot when you want the perfect flatbread to dip into anything from Hummus to Stew. Sourdough gives a lovely tang while the potato keeps these really soft and moist. Fill with feta for an extra cheesy treat or leave them as they are. An aromatic Za’atar-oil brushing makes them utterly irresistible.

    Why You Want to Make This

    Not sure about you, but I was always on the hunt for the perfect flatbread recipe and think I have finally found it. A bread that is easy to make, stays soft and fluffy, even the next day, has sourdough in it and tons of flavour. This really is the one.

    The Inspiration came from Claire Saffitz, who made her version just with yeast and white flour. I’ve added sourdough and a bit of whole wheat flour to mine, for both flavour and nutrition.

    Versatile

    While I made mine specifically to go with the large Mezze Feast I have started to post bit by bit over the last few days (you will get the complete article soon), which meant filling with feta and brushing with Za’atar oil, you can use them for literally anything that requires a soft and fluffy flatbread.
    Fill with different cheese or leave plain, add different herbs to the oil (rosemary and garlic would be lovely) or just brush with some garlic butter to finish.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Easy

    Most of the work is done by the stand mixer and the sourdough. You could even make them virtually no-knead, by just leaving them over night, to let only the sourdough develop the gluten.
    Or knead yourself by hand, if you don’t have a stand mixer.
    Basically it’s mashing a boiled potato, mixing the wet with the dry ingredients, kneading (or waiting) and rolling them out to quickly pan fry.

    The Ingredients

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process Ingredients

    Potato

    This sets these Sourdough Flatbread with Feta apart from other flatbreads you might have tried. It adds moisture and softness to the dough, you don’t get from just flour and water alone and makes them quite unique.

    Don’t throw out the starchy cooking water, since we will use it as liquid for the dough, helping the yeast to rise and the dough to stay lovely and soft.

    Sourdough

    I realise some are intimidated by sourdough, but it’s really just water, flour and time that makes it. Top up with more water and flour every few days, and you always have the base for all kinds of breads and even sweet treats on hand.
    Here is a guide on how to start your own.

    Flour

    You can use plain white flour if you like or bread flour, both will come out fine. I had bread flour on hand and more than plain for that matter, so that’s what I used. I replaced some of the white with whole wheat flour, for nutty flavour and nutrition.

    I wouldn’t raise the whole wheat content much further than this, as you might get very firm instead of soft and fluffy flatbreads.

    Yeast

    If you leave the dough to ferment overnight, you can skip the yeast. Since I wanted them on the same day and give a bit of extra rise, I included just a tiny bit, which helped with the extra fluffy texture.

    Salt

    I’m using kosher salt, as most of the time when cooking, So if you are using fine sea salt, half the amount, as it has about double the salting power of fine kosher salt.

    Olive oil

    This helps the dough stay moist and soft but makes for a pretty sticky and soft texture. Which is what we want. So apart from the 2 tbsp that get added to the mixture, use it liberally on your hands when working the dough, instead of the usual flour, which would dry it out.

    That’s already everything for the plain flatbread version. If you’d like to take them over the top, there are two more.

    Now since you can make the flatbreads plain, I didn’t include the Za’atar and Feta in the first ingredient picture. Both come only in towards the end and are optional.

    Za’atar

    A middle eastern spice mix, Za’atar usually contains dried soft thyme, sesame, and sumac (a sour dried and ground berry). Sometimes with other added ingredients, depending on the brand. It’s absolutely delicious mixed into olive oil as dip or topping for all kinds of bread or sprinkled over all sorts of dips like Hummus or Labneh. https://forthepleasureofeating.com/hummus-two-ways/
    In this case we are brushing the flatbreads with a mix of this and olive oil while frying, to get the flavour to really soak into the bread.

    Feta

    Use good quality creamy feta here, as you want it to melt into the dough, for little cheesy pockets of salty tang.

    The Process

    Start by boiling your potato until soft. Just barely cover it with water, don’t salt. Cook for 10-15 minutes, until you can pierce the pieces easily with a knife.
    Drain over a sieve with a cup underneath, to catch the cooking water. We need about ½ cup of it.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Leave both potato and water to cool to room temperature, so they don’t kill the sourdough or yeast when we mix them in.

    Once cooled enough, in a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, mash the potato with a fork or a potato masher.

    Add the flour, sourdough starter, salt, and olive oil.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    To the ½ cup lukewarm cooking water, add your yeast and let it stand for about 5-10 minutes, to allow it to activate. Once it has started to bubble a little, add the mix to your bowl with the flour and potato.

    At this point I usually mix briefly with a spoon, to get the wet and dry roughly incorporated, as my stand mixer never gets to all the flour on the sides of the bowl if I don’t. If yours does, feel free to skip this step.

    Knead on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes, until you have a very smooth and sticky dough that comes off the sides of your bowl.

    If you are kneading by hand, you may add a little flour, to make it easier to work with, but you still want a fairly soft and moist result.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Once your dough is smooth and elastic, form it into a ball and leave it to rise in an oiled large bowl you cover with clingfilm for 2-3 hours or until doubled in size.

    I usually put mine overnight in the fridge, which gives the sourdough time to ferment and add all it’s goodness to my flatbread. You can get away making it on the same day, I just feel the flavour develops much better overnight and it gives me a more flexible schedule on the day I plan to use it in whatever meal I want it to go with.

    Once your dough has doubled in size and you want your flatbreads ready in about 1h, oil your work surface (I like using a silicone mat, for easy cleaning) and divide it into 8 pieces.

    Now we are getting them into a round shape and give them even more rise by tucking in any irregular edges, until you have a round and smooth dome top, then put them on a parchment covered, oiled baking tray for their second rise. Here is a great video that shows this process with buns.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process
    Cover them loosely with oiled clingfilm and let them rise for another 30-40 minutes while you prepare whatever dip you plan to have with them.

    If you are filling them with feta and topping with Za’atar oil, crumble your feta into a bowl and mix the Za’atar with olive oil.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Once the dough had it’s second rise, oil your work surface again. Take a piece of dough and roughly flatten it with your hands until it’s the size of about 2 hands. This doesn’t have to be exact.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Crumble 2 tbsp of your feta over the dough, then roll it up like shown in the pictures.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    First into a sort of sausage shape.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Then in a spiral into itself, as if you were making cinnamon rolls one by one. Try not to pierce it, so the feta stays inside. But don’t worry if a bit crumbles out, these are homemade after all. We are not looking for perfection.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process
    Put each spiral back on the oiled baking sheet, while you form the rest.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta Process

    Get your pan lightly oiled first, then slowly heat it to medium/high heat. We want the dough to puff up pretty much instantly when it hits the pan, but not burn.

    While working with the dough, you will have noticed how sticky and soft it is, so we need a trick to get it into the pan in one piece. Claire Saffitz had a great one for that:
    2 lightly oiled pieces of baking parchment. Transfer your dough onto one, flatten a bit with your hands, then top with the second piece and roll out to a round-ish shape about 8in across.
    Peeling off the top piece of parchment, carry the flatbread on the bottom one to your pan and just flip it over, to transfer the dough into it.

    If using Za’atar oil, brush it onto the top side of the flatbread, while the first side is frying.
    Sprinkle with a little sea salt.

    Fry until one side is golden brown and comes off the pan easily. Since these behave very similar to pancakes, the cues will be little bubbles appearing on the top and the dough going from very shiny to a little matte. You will also start seeing slightly browned edges.
    In doubt take a peek underneath with your spatula.

    Flip and fry the second side until done. This will take less time than the first side.
    Keep warm in the oven, which you turned to the lowest temperature, while you fry the remaining pieces.

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Enjoy your warm homemade Sourdough Flatbread with Feta with all sorts of dips, as a side for stew or, just as they are with some olives and maybe pickles. I always want pickles. But maybe that’s just me?

    Meal Prep

    These Sourdough Flatbreads with Feta are fantastic for meal prep, as there are multiple ways to prepare and store them.

    For one you can prepare the dough the day before and let it rise overnight in the fridge, then take it out about 1h before you want to eat, to shape and fill them.

    The fried ones can be stored in a lidded container or plastic bag for about 2 days and just reheated when you’d like to eat. They reheat fantastic in air fryer, oven or pan.

    Alternatively you could freeze the portioned dough (though I wouldn’t fill it, as cheese isn’t ideal for freezing, since it can get watery) and just take it out a few hours before you want to eat them to thaw and roll out.

    The Mezze Feast

    Here are the recipes posted for the Mezze Feast so far. Mix and match whatever you like, use just one as super quick snack or dinner or all of them for one stunning feast:

    Hummus Two Ways

    Easy Tzatziki

    Muhammara

    Smoked Aubergine Dip

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

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    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta

    Soft and fluffy Sourdough Flatbread with Feta hits the spot when you want the perfect flatbread to dip into anything from Hummus to Stew. Sourdough gives a lovely tang while the potato keeps these really soft and moist. Fill with feta for an extra cheesy treat or leave them as they are. An aromatic Za’atar-oil brushing makes them utterly irresistible.
    Prep Time 30 minutes
    Cook Time 30 minutes
    Resting time 4 hours
    Total Time 5 hours
    Course Bread, Side Dish, Snack
    Cuisine Middle Eastern
    Servings 8
    Calories 265 kcal

    Equipment

    • Stand Mixer or large bowl, frying pan, cooking pot

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 russet potato peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
    • 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
    • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour or bread flour plus more for work surface
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    • 1 cup sourdough starter
    • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus more for bowl
    • 2 teaspoons Diamond Crystal kosher salt
    • Flaky salt for sprinkling the top
    • Feta-Za'atar Flatbread
    • 1/4 cup za'atar
    • 8 ounces 227g feta cheese, crumbled (about 1 1/2 cups)
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil plus more for rolling out

    Instructions
     

    • Start by boiling your potato until soft. Place the potato pieces in a pot, just barely covering them with water (do not add salt). Cook for 10-15 minutes until you can easily pierce the pieces with a knife.
    • Drain the potato over a sieve with a cup underneath to catch the cooking water. You'll need about ½ cup of this water. Allow both the potato and the water to cool to room temperature to avoid killing the sourdough or yeast when you mix them in.
    • Once the potato has cooled enough, mash it in a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer using a fork or potato masher.
    • Add the all-purpose or bread flour, whole wheat flour, sourdough starter, kosher salt, and olive oil to the mashed potato.
    • In the ½ cup of lukewarm cooking water, add the active dry yeast and let it stand for 5-10 minutes until it starts to bubble. Then, add this yeast mixture to the bowl with the flour and potato.
    • Mix briefly with a spoon to roughly incorporate the wet and dry ingredients, especially if your stand mixer doesn't reach all the flour on the sides of the bowl.
    • Knead the dough on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes until you have a very smooth and sticky dough that comes off the sides of the bowl. If kneading by hand, you can add a little more flour to make it easier to work with, but the dough should still be fairly soft and moist.
    • Form the dough into a ball and place it in an oiled large bowl. Cover the bowl with clingfilm and let the dough rise for 2-3 hours or until it has doubled in size. You can also refrigerate the dough overnight for better flavour development.
    • Once the dough has doubled in size, divide it into 8 pieces on an oiled work surface.
    • Shape each piece of dough into a round, smooth dome top, then place them on a parchment-covered, oiled baking tray for their second rise. Cover them loosely with oiled clingfilm and let them rise for another 30-40 minutes.
    • If you plan to fill the flatbreads with feta and top with za'atar, crumble the feta into a bowl and mix the za'atar with olive oil in a separate bowl.
    • After the second rise, oil your work surface again. Take a piece of dough and flatten it with your hands until it's about the size of two hands. It doesn't need to be perfectly round.
    • Crumble 2 tablespoons of feta over the dough, then roll it up. First, roll it into a sausage shape, then roll it into a spiral, making it resemble cinnamon rolls. Try to keep the feta inside, but don't worry if some crumbles out.
    • Place each spiral on the oiled baking sheet while you shape the remaining flatbreads.
    • Heat a pan to medium/high heat with a light coating of oil. We want the dough to puff up almost instantly when it hits the pan but not burn.
    • To transfer the dough into the pan, use two lightly oiled pieces of baking parchment. Transfer the dough onto one piece, flatten it with your hands, then place the second piece on top and roll it out to a round-ish shape about 8 inches across. Peel off the top piece of parchment and carry the flatbread on the bottom piece to the pan, flipping it over to transfer the dough into your frying pan.
    • If using the za'atar oil, brush it onto the top side of the flatbread while the first side is frying. Sprinkle with a little sea salt.
    • Fry until the first side is golden brown and comes off the pan easily. Flip and fry the second side until golden brown.
    • Keep the flatbreads warm in the oven, which you turned to the lowest temperature, while you fry the remaining pieces.
    • Enjoy your delicious Sourdough Flatbread with Feta and Za'atar!

    Notes

    I’m giving you the nutrition of flatbread and topping+ filling separate here, so you can decide if it fits your diet.
    Flatbreads plain:
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 166 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 4 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 30 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 3 grams
    Fiber per Portion: Approximately 3 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 524 milligrams
    Za’atar with oil and feta:
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 94 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 4 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 2 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 8 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 276 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 265kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Flatbread with Feta
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    265
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword meal prep, sourdough, Vegetarian, versatile
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