Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    These Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes are my festive version of the all-time favourite breakfast. Super fluffy and tangy from the buttermilk and sourdough, yet lots of good nutrition from protein powder, whole wheat flour and eggs. They might be the perfect pancake!
    And, since it’s the holidays, I’m serving them with homemade cranberry sauce topped with some extra indulgent Advocaat for a very grown up treat!

     

    Why You Want to Make Them

     

    Buttermilk and sourdough discard for flavour

    Have you ever had buttermilk pancakes? If not, it’s about time!
    Similar to buttermilk waffles, they are incredibly tender and flavourful. The tang of the sourdough emphasizes it and helps you use up your discard.
    And what’s more: The calories are even lower than for the version without buttermilk!

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Protein powder for extra nutrition

    Same as in my original, buttermilk free pancakes, I’m using my favourite protein powder here to up the nutrition. This time I added the toasted marshmallow flavoured version, since that’s what I just had delivered and wanted to try out. It was a full success since it balanced the tangy buttermilk beautifully with its sweetness.

    This is neither affiliated nor sponsored. Just the powder I found to taste best after trying a fair few. If you never found one you actually enjoy, give this one a try.

    Indulgent topping

    With it being the holidays, I was reminded of a very classic German cake we used to have around the season. It might be my all-time favourite German cake: An airy hazelnut-chocolate sponge, cranberry jam spread all over it, topped with whipped cream and crowned by a layer of Advocaat, just about contained by the whipped cream tufts around the edge of the cake.
    This is how it looks and it’s utterly delicious!

    Let me know if you’d like to see a recipe for it here and I might come up with a slightly healthier version of it.

    And while these pancakes have no cream or hazelnuts, the cranberry sauce and advocaat drizzled over made for a worthy breakfast reminder of it! Well….late breakfast. Not sure I can have advocaat early morning, but if you enjoy it, I’m certainly not judging!

    The Ingredients

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes_Ingredients

    Sourdough discard – You could use active starter here if you’d like, but since it’s not left to ferment, this is a great place to use up your discard. It will add flavour and nutrition to your pancakes. Don’t worry about it being too sour. Just a gentle tang is coming through, adding complexity.

    If you have no sourdough starter yet, here is how to make it. With its million uses, it’s one of the best things you can easily make at home with just water and flour. Plain white flour works fine.

    Buttermilk – Apart from being delicious and giving your pancakes an extra light texture, buttermilk is great for digestion, has lots of calcium and even aids your immune system if you have some daily.

    I’m mainly adding it for the taste, but the rest doesn’t do harm either, does it.
    If you don’t have buttermilk, here are several ways to substitute it.

    Flour – A mix of whole wheat flour and white flour gives the perfect balance of light and fluffy plus nutty flavour, fibre and better nutrition than just using plain white flour. During my weight loss journey I came to love whole wheat flour in nearly all of my baked goods. Partially because it keeps you fuller for longer, but again mainly for the added flavour. You can use other types of flour instead such as spelt. Or just use all white flour.

    Protein powder – As mentioned above, I’m using MyProtein here, as I love the creamy consistency and flavours they offer. Use one that you enjoy having as a shake, and you’ll like it in the pancakes too. Ideal for this recipe are vanilla or similar flavours. Though, if you have something like chocolate or hazelnut, it might even serve as more of a reminder for the Cranberry-Advocaat cake. If you try it, let me know what you think.

    Eggs – I upped the portion size of this recipe compared to the original Sourdough Protein Pancakes, as I love having some in the freezer for a super quick breakfast when toasted. Hence 2 eggs. The egg to pancake ratio is a little bit higher and I think it benefits the flavour. Plus of course more protein is always welcome.

    Soy Milk – I’m using soy milk for its creamy texture and protein content. You could substitute with full fat cows’ milk if you want or any other full fat plant milk.

    Coconut oil – Adding coconut oil gives these Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes a very subtle scent of coconut and a crispy crust. I also use some for frying them in. You could use melted and cooled butter instead, if you prefer the flavour.

    Vanilla extract – The vanilla extract on top of the vanilla scent of the protein powder will spread a heavenly smell throughout your house and give the pancakes that extra special flavour. Don’t skip it.

    Salt – Every sweet baked good needs a pinch of salt to bring out the flavours and balance the sweetness.

    Cinnamon – This is optional but delicious, especially during the holiday season. You can leave it out if you prefer or even up the content if you like more cinnamon flavour. It goes particularly well with the cranberries.

    Baking powder and soda – I’m using more baking soda than powder in this recipe, as it’s activated by the acidity of the buttermilk and adds the fluffiness to the pancakes.

    Topping – Optional. For my extra special holiday breakfast, I’m using a home made Cranberry Sauce with Port and Clementines. You could use any leftover cranberry sauce, as long as it’s not seasoned with salt and pepper. Though…you do you of course.
    As reminder of the above mentioned Cranberry-Advocaat cake, I’m topping the whole thing with Advocaat as a treat. If you have never tried it on your pancakes, you are missing out!

    These Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes would be equally delicious with sliced banana, Nutella, and Advocaat. My all-time favourite pancake topping!

    The Process

     

    Mix the wet and protein

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes_Process

    In a large mixing bowl or blender, combine the sourdough discard, buttermilk, soy milk, protein powder, eggs, coconut oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well until the ingredients are fully incorporated and no protein lumps are left.

    Mix the wet with the dry

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes_Process

    For the next step: You can prepare the batter the evening before, but if you do, leave out the baking powder and soda until the next morning, as it would lose some of its effectiveness overnight.

    In a separate bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, cinnamon, baking powder and soda, and fine sea salt.

    Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, stirring gently with a spatula until just combined. Avoid overmixing; a few lumps in the batter are fine.

    Frying

    Preheat a non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat. If needed, lightly grease the surface with additional coconut oil.

    Once the skillet is hot, pour approximately 1/4 cup of the pancake batter onto the skillet for each pancake. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until bubbles start to form on the surface and it looks matte.

    Carefully flip the pancakes with just a flip of your wrist, to avoid them sliding across the pan, and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until they are golden brown and cooked through.

    If you’d like to keep the stack of pancakes warm while you fry the rest, keep them on a plate in your oven, set to the lowest temperature.

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Serve

    Serve the Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes stacked on a plate, topped with icing sugar if you like, cranberry sauce and Advocaat drizzled over for the grown up version.

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Meal Prep

     

    As most of my recipes, Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes are great for meal prep.
    There is the fact that you can prepare the batter, except baking soda and powder, in the evening and it only gets better overnight.

    Once fried, they freeze really well and can be heated through simply in the toaster. I like to keep them in portions in little bags or containers, so I can just grab a super quick and healthy breakfast, when I’m in a hurry.

    Looking for other breakfasts with Protein?

    Try this Apple Cinnamon Protein Oatmeal, bringing the flavours of German Christmas Market right onto your breakfast table.

    Or maybe some Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein?

    Looking for other sourdough discard ideas with protein?

    Sourdough Protein Pancakes with Wholewheat

    Sourdough Pumpkin Waffles with Protein

    Sourdough Chocolate Banana Bread with Rye and Protein

    Sourdough Brownies with Protein

     

    Please Comment

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    With Cranberries and Advocaat topping These Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes are my festive version of the all-time favourite breakfast. Super fluffy and tangy from the buttermilk and sourdough, yet lots of good nutrition from protein powder, whole wheat flour and eggs. They might be the perfect pancake! And, since it’s the holidays, I’m serving them with homemade cranberry sauce topped with some extra indulgent Advocaat for a very grown up treat!
    4.96 from 21 votes
    Prep Time 10 minutes
    Cook Time 20 minutes
    Total Time 30 minutes
    Course Breakfast
    Cuisine American
    Servings 24 pancakes
    Calories 100 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 cup Sourdough discard
    • 1 cup buttermilk
    • ¾ cup soy milk
    • 2 large eggs
    • 4 tbsp Coconut oil melted and cooled
    • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 1 ¼ cup whole wheat flour
    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 2 Scoops Protein Powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 2 tsp baking soda
    • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

    Optional topping:

    • Icing sugar
    • Cranberry sauce and Advocaat to taste

    Instructions
     

    Mix the Wet and Protein:

    • In a large mixing bowl or blender, combine the sourdough discard, buttermilk, soy milk, protein powder, eggs, melted coconut oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well until the ingredients are fully incorporated and no protein lumps are left.

    Mix the Wet with the Dry:

    • In a separate bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, ground cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and fine sea salt. If preparing the batter the evening before, leave out the baking powder and soda until the next morning.
    • Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, stirring gently with a spatula until just combined. Avoid overmixing; a few lumps in the batter are fine.

    Frying:

    • Preheat a non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat. If needed, lightly grease the surface with additional coconut oil.
    • Once the skillet is hot, pour approximately 1/4 cup of the pancake batter onto the skillet for each pancake. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until bubbles start to form on the surface and it looks matte.
    • Carefully flip the pancakes with just a flip of your wrist, to avoid them sliding across the pan, and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until they are golden brown and cooked through.
    • If you’d like to keep the stack warm while you fry the rest, keep them on a plate in your oven, set to the lowest temperature.

    Serve:

    • Serve stacked on a plate, topped with icing sugar if desired, and drizzle with cranberry sauce and Advocaat for the grown-up version.
    • Enjoy your delicious Sourdough Buttermilk Pancakes!

    Notes

    As most of my recipes, Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes are great for meal prep.
    There is the fact that you can prepare the batter, except baking soda and powder, in the evening and it only gets better overnight.
    Once fried, they freeze really well and can be heated through simply in the toaster. I like to keep them in portions in little bags or containers, so I can just grab a super quick and healthy breakfast, when I’m in a hurry.
    The nutrition is calculated without toppings, as the nutrition would vary depending on what you use and how much of it.
    Calories: Approximately 100 kcal per serving
    Protein: Around 4g
    Carbohydrates: Roughly 15g
    Fat: About 3g
    Fiber: Around 2g
    Sugar: Approximately 1g

    Nutrition

    Calories: 100kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    100
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, Protein, sourdough, Vegetarian, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Super soft and fluffy, flavourful Sourdough Discard Naan breads, that are both easy to make and good for you due to the benefits of sourdough. The ingredients will probably already be in your store cupboard or fridge. These are incredibly versatile to use as flatbread recipe for all kinds of meals, including the Falafel Wraps I created them for, a quick pizza or to brush with garlic butter and enjoy them with a curry.

    Why You Want to Make These

     

    Flavour

    Have you ever bought Naan bread in the supermarket, but after trying fresh Naan in an Indian restaurant, you feel they always fall short on the flavour and texture front? Yeah, me too.
    I absolutely loved the super soft and fluffy flatbreads at an Indian place and nearly enjoyed them more than the Chicken Korma they came with. To me, Bread is a main part of a meal and I’d like it to be utterly delicious.

    That’s why I make pretty much all of my bread at home. Being German and used to really good bread straight from the bakery around the corner, I always felt standard yeast bread doesn’t entirely live up to what I enjoy. After moving to Ireland, I realised that the lack of flavour was due to the fact that most breads in Germany include sourdough, which gives them a distinct gentle to strong tang, and layers of flavour, depending on how long you allow it to ferment before baking. After that realisation I started trying different recipes using it, including sweet baked goods with great success.

    This Sourdough Discard Naan is no exception. Starting with a yeast based recipe from one of my all-time favourite blogs “Half Baked Harvest”, I modified it to include sourdough as it’s main raising ingredient and for flavour and am absolutely delighted with the results. Soft, fluffy, easy to wrap around anything you might decide to roll into them, with a very gentle tang from said sourdough, these are absolutely everything I want from bread.

     

    Sourdough

    A word on sourdough, which might sound familiar if you read my recipe for German Sourdough Rye Beer Dutch Oven Bread, so you could skip ahead if you did.

    Sourdough and long rising time make the bread very easy digestible, which is especially helpful for those of you that have a gluten sensitivity. Sourdough bread is known to have a much slower release of sugar, not spiking insulin as fast compared to white bread made with yeast or from the supermarket, meaning even diabetics can eat it (within reason).
    It’s great if you are on a diet and don’t want to give up bread, as it’s very nutritious and makes you feel full longer.

    It’s also very flexible and versatile when it comes generally to baked goods, so I use it in everything from bread to even brownies, as it adds so much in terms of flavour.

    Flexible

    The fact that the sourdough gets better with a slower rise and is happy to wait for you in the fridge for up to 48 hours makes these Sourdough Discard Naan breads incredibly flexible for meal prep or a family feast you are planning. You can do everything in advance except the frying of the bread.
    Though I found that they keep really well in a bread tin, to be re-heated for a few seconds in the microwave when you want to enjoy them. So even that would be an option, to relax on workdays or when your guests are around.

    Versatile

    Sourdough Naan is a fantastic side not just for Indian curries, but pretty much everything that goes with soft and fluffy flatbread. That can be a stew, to mop up the juices, Falafel Wraps (Recipe coming soon) or even as a base for a super quick weekday pizza. Or of course very classic brushed with garlic butter, which makes them pretty irresistible.

    You can use either these Sourdough Discard Naan or my Sourdough Flatbread with Feta in the upcoming Mezze Feast, depending on your preference and if you’d like to create wraps with Falafels or not.

    The Ingredients

    Besides the above mentioned Sourdough starter, you’ll need flour. I used a mix of plain white flour and whole wheat, to add some nutrition and nutty flavour.
    You can use all plain white or bread flour here, for even softer, chewier Naans.
    Even though I read that traditional Naan back in time was made with only whole wheat flour, I wouldn’t advise it, if you want to wrap anything into the flatbreads, as it tends to give a little firmer consistency.

    Milk

    I’m using Oat milk here, as I’m lactose intolerant, but you can use any kind of full fat milk. The fat content adds to the softness, which is why I’m not using unsweetened Almond milk or similar, to not change the consistency.

    Butter

    Butter gives these Naan breads their incredible softness and adds a lovely moisture to the dough. Plus of course flavour. I’m not using much, 4 tbsp are enough to give the desired effect.
    You could use olive or neutral oil instead if you are vegan or rather avoid butter.

    Greek Yoghurt

    Greek Yoghurt, similar to the butter, adds to the softness and moisture of the bread and is essential to get the super pliable bread I’m aiming for. Full fat in this case, as that will help with all 3 of the above characteristics.

    Yeast

    In theory you wouldn’t need yeast here if you want to let the sourdough do it’s thing overnight. But I added it as I was in a bit of a hurry and wanted to eat the bread on the same day. The rise was rather fast and lively with yeast, so you can probably even leave it out if you prepare the dough early morning for dinner.

    Baking Powder and Baking Soda

    Similar to the yeast, but with even quicker rising abilities, you can give your Naan Bread a boost by adding these, if you have, say, only a few hours until you want to eat.

    I ended up leaving them out, as they lose their functionality when left for a longer fermentation, which is what I usually aim for with sourdough. Just know it’s an option for getting fluffy Naan if you are in a hurry.

    Honey

    I’m using a little honey here to feed the yeast, which loves a little sweetness to wake up. Also to balance the tang from the sourdough.
    You could use sugar instead, if you prefer.

    Salt

    One of the main differentiating ingredients between bland bread and really good bread is salt. Not much, but enough to give it some flavour. Just don’t mix it with the yeast at the start, as yeast will die immediately when touching salt. Instead mix it into the flour, so it’s less concentrated before coming in contact.
    I’m using Kosher salt here, as pretty much always, because it gives me more control over the seasoning. If you use sea salt, use half of the given amount.

    The Process

     

    The Wet

    Warm the milk in the microwave or in a pot for a moment, just to get it lukewarm and add the warm water. It should just feel very slightly warm to the touch and comfortable on the skin. Mix in the yeast and honey and let it stand for about 10 minutes, to activate the yeast. If you see some bubbles appearing after that time, your yeast is alive and will do its job. If not, it’s too old and won’t add any rise to your bread. If you have used your yeast recently and know it’s still fresh, you can skip this step and add milk, water and yeast together with the other wet ingredients.

    Melt the Butter and let it cool to lukewarm or room temperature, so it doesn’t kill the yeast or sourdough on contact.

    The Dry

    Add first the flour, salt, baking powder and soda (if using) to a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer. Give the dry ingredients a good mix, to disperse the salt.

    Add the remaining ingredients and mix briefly with a spoon. If your stand mixer manages to catch the flour from the sides easily, you can skip the spoon step. I noticed mine does a better job when I briefly pre-mix.

    Kneading

    Knead the dough on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes or until very smooth and elastic. To check if it’s ready and has developed enough gluten, perform the windowpane test.

    The dough should at this point be smooth and reasonably easy to work with, but slightly sticky, which will change after it had time to rise. If you feel it’s too sticky, add a little flour at a time.

    Shape into a smooth ball with your hands and put into a lightly oiled bowl. I often simply use the cleaned bowl of my stand mixer, as it has a lid attached, so I can let the dough rise at room temperature. If keeping it in the fridge overnight, I love a Tupperware bowl designed specifically for yeasted doughs, as the lid “plops” open once the dough has risen enough.

    Shaping

    Once your dough has risen to about double its size or, if you had it in the fridge, the next day, divide it into 8 equal pieces.Take each piece form it into a round bun.

    At this point you can either roll them out right away or store in the fridge or freezer for another day.
    I often store a few unbaked ones in my freezer, as they take only a few hours to thaw, so I can have homemade fresh Naan anytime.

    Once you want to fry your Naan bread (which will take about 2-4 minutes per portion), lightly flour your work surface. Use either lightly floured rolling pin or, if you have one, a tortilla press lined with a cut open freezer bag, to get your Naan bread into shape.

    You can aim either for an oval or round. They should be relatively thin without ripping. About ¼ inch thick is a good guideline. A tortilla press will achieve a pretty decent even round shape, while rolling pins tend to produce something more oval. But then, these are Naan breads and homemade, they are not supposed to look perfect.

    Frying

    Get a frying pan you have a lid for really hot on medium-high heat. Add a small bit of olive oil and rub it around the pan carefully with a bunched up paper towel, so you don’t burn yourself.

    Add a rolled out Naan bread to the pan and cover with the lid immediately. This is where the magic happens.You’ll see the characteristic big bubbles appearing after about 1 minute.


    Flip the bread and cook uncovered for another minute or two, until the bubbles on the now underside show golden browning.

    To keep these really soft and pliable, I used a trick I learned from a friend: Take one large plate, cover with a clean kitchen towel, add the fried Sourdough Naan and wrap it with the towel, then cover with another large plate that is turned upside down. This will keep the steam and moisture inside, meaning your bread will be perfectly soft and warm until you are done frying.

    Serving

    If you’d like to brush them with garlic butter (I didn’t, since I made them for Falafel wraps), do so ideally right after frying and sprinkle with a few chopped herbs, such as Cilantro, if you like.

    Enjoy your super soft and fluffy Sourdough Discard Naan in any way you like.

     

    Meal Prep

    The fact that the sourdough can be kept in the fridge for up to 2 days allows for easy planning around mealtimes and days. The flavour only gets better during that time.

    As mentioned above, you can freeze the divided dough in portions. Either in freezer bags or a freezer proof container.
    Alternatively roll them out and store between layers of baking parchment and freeze like that, which allows for even quicker use.

    Or, as last variant to freeze, fry all and freeze some of the readily fried ones in freezer bags once cooled, to always have a super quick homemade bread or pizza option.

    Without freezing, these Naan Breads keep in an airtight container for about 3-4 days. Re-heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. I did this in a special tortilla warmer than can go into the microwave, which gave me absolutely brilliant results. I got the warmer together with my tortilla press as an added benefit.

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    The Mezze Feast

    Here are the recipes posted for the Mezze Feast so far. Mix and match whatever you like, use just one as super quick snack or dinner or all of them for one stunning feast.
    Use either these Sourdough Discard Naans or the Sourdough Flatbread with Feta as your bread for it.

    Hummus Two Ways

    Easy Tzatziki

    Muhammara

    Smoked Aubergine Dip

    Roasted Garlic Lemon Labneh

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Naan

    Sourdough Discard Naan

    Super soft and fluffy, flavourful Sourdough Naan breads, that are both easy to make and good for you due to the benefits of sourdough. The ingredients will probably already be in your store cupboard or fridge and the hands on time is just minutes. These are incredibly versatile to use as flatbread recipe for all kinds of recipes, including the Falafel Wraps I made them for. Or to brush with garlic butter and enjoy them with a curry.
    5 from 14 votes
    Prep Time 20 minutes
    Cook Time 20 minutes
    Resting time 2 hours
    Total Time 2 hours 40 minutes
    Course Appetizer, Bread, Ingredient, Side Dish, Snack
    Cuisine Indian
    Servings 8
    Calories 309 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • ½ cup oat milk or any full fat milk of your choice
    • ¼ cup warm water
    • 1 tbsp honey
    • ½ tsp active dry yeast
    • 1 cup full fat Greek yoghurt
    • 1 cup sourdough starter active or discard
    • 2.5 cups plain white flour
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour ideally fine
    • ½ tsp kosher salt half if using sea salt
    • 4 tbsp butter melted and cooled to room temperature

    If you want to fry your Sourdough Naan within 1-2h:

    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp baking soda

    Instructions
     

    • Warm the milk in the microwave or in a pot until it's lukewarm. Add the warm water. It should feel slightly warm to the touch and comfortable on the skin. Mix in the yeast and honey and let it stand for about 10 minutes to activate the yeast. If you see bubbles forming, your yeast is alive and active.
    • Melt the butter and let it cool to lukewarm or room temperature to avoid killing the yeast or sourdough.
    • In a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, add the white flour, whole wheat flour, salt, and optional baking powder and soda (if using). Mix the dry ingredients to disperse the salt evenly.
    • Add the remaining ingredients, including the yeast mixture and melted butter. Mix briefly with a spoon or in your stand mixer. If your stand mixer easily catches the flour from the sides, you can skip the initial spoon mixing.
    • Knead the dough on medium speed for about 8-10 minutes or until it becomes very smooth and elastic. To check if it's ready and has developed enough gluten, perform the windowpane test.
    • The dough should be smooth and slightly sticky at this point, but it will become easier to work with as it rises. If it feels too sticky, add a little flour at a time.
    • Shape the dough into a smooth ball with your hands and place it in a lightly oiled bowl for rising. You can use the bowl of your stand mixer or a suitable container with a lid. Let the dough rise at room temperature until it doubles in size. If you plan to refrigerate it overnight, use a large container, as the dough may expand significantly.
    • Once the dough has doubled in size, or the next day if refrigerated, divide it into 8 equal pieces. Take each piece and tuck the edges underneath to form a round bun with a smooth surface.
    • You can choose to roll them out immediately or store them in the fridge or freezer for later use. Frozen naan can be thawed in just a few hours for fresh naan anytime.
    • When you're ready to fry your naan bread, lightly flour your work surface. Use a lightly floured rolling pin or a tortilla press lined with a cut-open freezer bag to shape the naan. Aim for a relatively thin, oval or round shape, about ¼ inch thick.
    • Heat a frying pan with a lid on medium-high heat. Add a small amount of olive oil and rub it around the pan with a bunched-up paper towel.
    • Place a rolled-out naan in the pan and cover it with the lid immediately. Bubbles should start appearing after about 1 minute.
    • Flip the naan and cook uncovered for another 1-2 minutes until the underside shows golden browning and is cooked through.
    • To keep the naan soft and pliable, stack them between two large plates covered with a clean kitchen towel. This will help retain the steam and moisture, keeping the naan warm and soft until you're done frying.
    • If desired, brush the naan with garlic butter and sprinkle with chopped herbs, such as cilantro, right after frying.
    • Your homemade sourdough discard naan is now ready to be enjoyed!

    Notes

    Without freezing, these Naan Breads keep in an airtight container for about 3-4 days. Re-heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. I did this in a special tortilla warmer than can go into the microwave, which gave me absolutely brilliant results.
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 309 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 9 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 53 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 6 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 193 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 309kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Discard Naan
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    309
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, meal prep, sourdough, Vegetarian, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    A moist and crunchy fall treat, these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have it all: Lots of soft and juicy apples, that get pre-cooked and smothered in cinnamon spiked sourdough-pumpkin puree mix. The Protein powder adds nutrition and sweetness, replacing part of the flour. A cinnamon sugar sprinkling gives an extra crunchy top in contrast to the soft insides.

    Why You Want to Make These

    In Autumn, we want apples and pumpkin for sure. But why choose one when you can have both, right? Right.
    I’m greedy, so I always want both. Why would I have to choose?

    While watching yet another great Claire Saffitz Video I remembered an apple cake very similar to hers I kept making when I was in my 20s. Unfortunately the recipe was lost, but it had pre-cooked apples and a very similar batter to the one in the video. So of course I had to make something similar.

    But, having evolved to incorporating sourdough and protein into pretty much everything sweet I bake, I made a few modifications, to be able to do both. And pumpkin Puree. Because more veggies are always a plus!

    Sourdough

    I’m using sourdough discard here, as we are not needing its rising power here and we don’t want to let it ferment either, since that would develop the gluten and lead to tougher muffins. Instead we are looking for light and tender. So the sourdough is mainly for adding tangy flavour, to contrast with the sweet pumpkin puree.
    And a way to use up sourdough discard, which is always welcome. If you prefer to make it without, replace with ½ cup liquid (more of the apple cooking liquid would be great) and 1/2 cup flour of your choice.

    Apples

    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have loads of apples. Layers of tender, cinnamon tasting pieces all throughout the dough, in every single bite.
    I achieved that by pre-cooking them with cinnamon in the oven, until they are really soft.
    I don’t want them to fall apart though, so I’m using Pink Lady apples, which keep their shape nicely and I leave the skin on. That will also keep the nutrition from the skin, which holds most of it.

    I quite enjoy a bit of acidity in my apples, hence the Pink Lady. They are easy to find in supermarkets and have just the right balance of sweet, intense apple flavour and fresh acidity with a firm flesh.
    If you enjoy a different type of apple, feel free to use it.

    One note: Even though Bramley apples or cooking apples are usually great for cooking, I wouldn’t use them here, as they just fall apart into a mush. And we want slices that hold their shape.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Ingredients

    Pumpkin Puree

    Its gentle sweetness and lovely orange colour makes pumpkin puree a great inclusion for many baked goods. These fluffy Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein for example or my Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein. With the added sweetness I need less refined sugar and get an extra dose of fibre instead.

    Since I live in Ireland, Fallon & Byrne seems to be the only shop that has Pumpkin Puree.
    And occasionally one American food shop online.
    If you live in the US: Lucky you! I hear you get it pretty much everywhere.

    And while I usually think most things are better from scratch, I don’t think I want to go through the effort of chopping, peeling, cooking, and de-watering a whole pumpkin to get this. So cans are just fine.

    Protein Powder

    As with so many of my recipes, I’m adding my favourite Protein Powder here. In this case “Cinnamon Danish” from “MyProtein”.
    This is neither affiliated nor sponsored. Just the powder I found to taste best after trying a fair few. If you never found one you actually enjoy, give this one a try.

    I’m replacing up to ¼ of the white flour with it, to up my protein intake and be able to lower the added sugar even more. So if you’d like to make the Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins without protein, replace 1:1 with flour and add some sugar. I’d say about 1 tbsp.

    Why Protein?

    If you read a few of my baked or breakfast recipes, you can skip this part. For those of you who haven’t:
    Personally I found, while tracking my macros during my weight loss journey, I’m not even close to eating enough of it every day, as I’m not the biggest fan of meat and pulses. And while nuts for example are a great source for protein, they also have a lot of calories, so I can add them only sparingly, if I want to keep my weight.

    Considering protein can help you keep your bones strong, help with building muscle, and help with feeling fuller for longer, I find it pretty important to get enough of it. And Protein powder is a very practical way for me to do so.

    Now of course I could just drink a protein shake or two per day, but I’d rather not drink my calories, and instead prefer to find ways to include it into my food.
    How do I do that? I replace up to ¼ of the flour and sugar in a recipe with it. Which, in my mind is a win/win situation.

    Flour

    For once I’m not mixing white and whole wheat flour but using only fine whole wheat flour, since it goes just so well with the apples with its nutty flavour. Plus, with these muffins being incredibly moist and juicy, it can soak up more of it.

    Olive Oil

    While butter could work here if melted, oil (you could also use coconut oil, if you don’t mine the flavour it adds) adds even more to the moist character. Batter with oil tends to be very tender and soft, which is the aim here.

    Spices

    You could use 2 tsp ready made pumpkin spice or make your own using the separate spices stated in the ingredients. If you are planning to make more pumpkin based recipes, it might pay out to prepare a bigger batch and keep it in an airtight container in your cupboard. It’ll last as long as the spices on their own would. Though if you do, use 1 tsp cinnamon, rather than ½ on the same amount of the other spices. Maybe add some clove if you like. Just a tiny amount, it can be overpowering.

    The Remaining Ingredients

    The raising agents are needed, because we won’t let the sourdough ferment and with that it won’t act as raising agent. But a bit of fluffiness is required. And since the apples and whole wheat would make this dough pretty heavy, there is a decent amount needed here.

    Apple Cider Vinegar activates the baking soda and gives a nice tang to these otherwise rather sweet muffins.

    The honey is used to sweeten the apples while pre-roasting and lends fantastic flavour to the dough later. Some brown sugar for sweetness, chewiness, and structure.

    Vanilla essence. How could I not? It just belongs into muffins or pretty much any sweet dough.

    Eggs of course. We are making muffins after all. And a hint of salt for balance.

    The Paper Muffin Cases

    I feel most of the time it doesn’t matter much, if you bake muffins with or without the little paper forms, but for these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein I would urge you to line your muffin tin with them, as they are just so juicy, they might stick too much to get them out or fall apart.

    The Process

    Pre-heat your oven to 175°C (350°F)

    Apples

    Slice the apples first. I just cut them straight down around the core, then sliced them thinly.
    If you have an apple corer, that will work really well, as you could just use a mandolin to slice after. Alas, I don’t own one, as I always found it leaves too much of the core in my apple. And that, to me, feels similar to surprisingly found fish bones. But then, I might just be weird.

    Now lay some baking parchment into an oven proof large dish that will hold all your sliced apples. We will stack them alternating apples with drizzles of honey. Finish with honey and a little bit of olive oil drizzled over, to keep them moist.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Bake for about 1h-1h15min, turning the apples every 15minutes, so the top doesn’t dry out and all bake evenly.

    Take them out to let them cool a while. Whatever you do: Do NOT throw out the liquid. The juices from the baking with all the flavour of apples and honey will provide the fluid content of the muffins. That was my favourite part from Claire’s Apple cake. It’s such a good use for them and adds so much flavour!

    Once they are cooled to room temperature, while holding back the apples, pour the liquid that has formed into a cup. Measure out ¼ cup.

    The Protein Powder

    If you read some of my recipes, you know what I’ll tell you and can skip ahead. If you haven’t, here is the secret to the protein powder being integrated into the batter without any lumps and floury texture: Pre-mix well with the wet ingredients.

    I often use my Nutribullet (again, neither affiliated, nor sponsored), add eggs, olive oil, the ¼ cup liquid from the apples, vanilla, pumpkin puree, apple cider vinegar, the protein powder and, if it fits the sugar and sourdough. Give it a 1 minute mix and admire the super creamy, fluffy mixture you just created.

    If you have no Nutribullet, any high speed blender will work. No blender or just a slow one? That or a bowl and a hand mixer or whisk are fine too. Without high speed blender however, add everything above except the olive oil. Mix until you have a creamy mixture, then, slowly, similar to making mayonnaise, first drizzle, then, once half is incorporated, stream in the olive all, while mixing. This will emulsify it instead of creating greasiness.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Mix the wet with the dry

    Mix the baking powder, spices, salt and flour in a large bowl. Add the creamy protein mix and stir until the four is just incorporated. Don’t overmix, to avoid tough muffins.

    Now take out some of the non-broken apple slices from the cooked apples and set aside for the top of the muffins. Carefully fold the rest into the batter.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Filling the Muffin Cases

    Line your muffin tin with paper muffin cases.
    If you don’t have any, grease your muffin tin really well, using melted butter and a pastry brush. Then dust some flour over them and shake, so the moulds are all well coated. I still wouldn’t guarantee you get all the muffins out perfectly, but this will give you the best chance.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein_Process

    Using either an ice/cookie scoop or 2 tablespoons, spoon your batter into the muffin cases. You can either make about 15-16 smaller muffins or 12 really large ones. I filled most of mine about 2/3, not wanting them to overflow. Then made 3 pretty full, to have the top puff up. Those 3 were my favourites in the end. But use your preferred shape.

    Top with the remaining apple slices and some brown sugar with cinnamon. About 2 tbsp with ½ tsp cinnamon works well. I used demerara sugar for this, as it gives the best crunch.

    Bake

    Bake at 175°C (350°F) for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.

    Let them cool a little, as they will be very soft straight from the oven and firm up a bit while cooling.

    Serve as they are or with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein
    Meal Prep

    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein freeze really well. I keep them in portions of 3-4 in small freezer bags and whenever I want them, I pop them into the air fryer or oven for about 8 minutes, for a juicy and crunchy treat. They are great for breakfast or dessert, and will keep you satisfied for a while.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Looking for a warming fall dinner? Try my Black Garlic Pork Ramen. If you meal prep the Cuban Air Fryer Pork for it, you can also make Pork Banh Mi buns with nearly the same ingredients.

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein

    A moist and crunchy fall treat, these Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein have it all: Lots of soft and juicy apples, that get pre-cooked and smothered in cinnamon spiked sourdough-pumpkin puree mix. The Protein powder adds nutrition and sweetness, replacing part of the flour. A cinnamon sugar sprinkling gives an extra crunchy top in contrast to the soft insides.
    No ratings yet
    Prep Time 45 minutes
    Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
    Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes
    Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine American
    Servings 12
    Calories 189 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 pound firm sweet-tart apples about 5 medium – Roast, take out ¼ cup of the liquid
    • 4 tablespoons honey
    • 1 cup pumpkin puree
    • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
    • 1 cup sourdough starter unfed/discard
    • ½ cup protein powder
    • 3 large eggs at room temperature
    • 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • 3/4 cups fine whole wheat flour
    • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
    • 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon divided, 1 tsp used for cinnamon sugar
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
    • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • 1/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons demerara sugar 2 tbsp used for cinnamon sugar

    Instructions
     

    Start by preparing the roasted apples:

    • Slice the apples thinly, removing the core.
    • Lay baking parchment in an ovenproof dish and stack the sliced apples, drizzling honey between layers.
    • Finish with honey and a drizzle of olive oil.
    • Bake for 1 to 1 hour and 15 minutes, turning the apples every 15 minutes to prevent drying.
    • Once baked, let the apples cool, but do not discard the liquid.
    • When the roasted apples are at room temperature, pour the liquid that has formed into a cup, measuring out ¼ cup.
    • Pick out a few of the slices that look good and put aside, to top the muffins later.

    Prepare the protein powder mixture:

    • In a blender (Nutribullet or similar), combine the eggs, ¼ cup of liquid from the apples, olive oil, vanilla extract, pumpkin puree, apple cider vinegar, protein powder, and, if desired, the sugar and sourdough starter.
    • Blend for about 1 minute until you have a creamy, fluffy mixture.
    • If you don't have a high-speed blender, combine all the ingredients except the olive oil. Mix until creamy, and then slowly drizzle in the olive oil while mixing to emulsify.
    • In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients:
    • Mix the whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg.

    Mix the wet with the dry:

    • Add the creamy protein mixture to the dry ingredients and stir until the flour is just incorporated. Avoid overmixing to prevent tough muffins.
    • Fold the apple slices from the roasted apples into the batter.

    Filling the Muffin Cases:

    • Line your muffin tin with paper muffin cases.
    • If you don't have any, grease the muffin tin with melted butter and a pastry brush, then dust with flour.
    • Use an ice cream scoop or two spoons to fill the muffin cases, about 2/3 full.
    • Top with the remaining apple slices and sprinkle with a mixture of demerara sugar and cinnamon (about 2 tablespoons of sugar with ½ teaspoon of cinnamon).
    • Bake at 175°C (350°F) for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.
    • Let the muffins cool slightly as they will firm up a bit while cooling.
    • Serve the Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein as they are or with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. Enjoy!

    Notes

    Meal Prep
    These Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein freeze really well. I keep them in portions of 3-4 in small freezer bags and whenever I want them, I pop them into the air fryer or oven for about 8 minutes, for a juicy and crunchy treat.
    Calories per Portion: Approximately 189 calories
    Protein per Portion: Approximately 4 grams
    Carbohydrates per Portion: Approximately 27 grams
    Fat per Portion: Approximately 8 grams
    Fiber per Portion: Approximately 2 grams
    Sugar per Portion: Approximately 14 grams
    Sodium per Portion: Approximately 297 milligrams

    Nutrition

    Calories: 189kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Pumpkin Apple Muffins with Protein
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    189
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Breakfast, Easy, fruit, Healthy, Protein, sourdough, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Just the breakfast you need for fall, my Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein give you an easy and quick breakfast with hidden veggies from the pumpkin, extra nutrition from the protein powder plus a contrasting slight tang from sourdough discard. The result is a fluffy, satisfying pancake with a bright colour to make you feel all warm and cosy.

    Why You Want To Make This

     

    Sourdough

    In pursuit of uses for my sourdough discard, I basically add it to pretty much anything that contains flour, starting from flat bread over waffles all the way to cookies and cakes.
    I feel it adds it’s benefits and so much flavour to anything it touches.

    Two studies found that sourdough might be able to help with celiac disease due to eliminating the toxicity of wheat flour during long term fermentation.

    Considering most of these benefits occur once the sourdough had time to slowly ferment, I usually make these the evening before and put the dough in the fridge, to give the little yeast bacteria time to do their job. Even though I’m not gluten intolerant, but the benefits in nutrition would be helpful for anyone.

    Protein

    Now apart from the sourdough, which would be plenty of reasons to eat these, I’ve also added protein powder, which replaces part of the flour. Why, you ask, would I add protein?
    Personally I found, while tracking my macros during my weight loss journey, I’m not even close to eating enough of it every day, as I’m not the biggest fan of meat and pulses. And while nuts for example are a great source for protein, they also have a lot of calories, so I can add them only sparingly, if I want to keep my weight.

    Considering protein can help you keep your bones strong, help with building muscle, and help with feeling fuller for longer, I find it pretty important to get enough of it. And Protein powder is a very practical way for me to do so.

    Now of course I could just drink a protein shake or two per day, but I’d rather not drink my calories, but prefer to find ways to include it into my food.
    How do I do that? I replace up to ¼ of the flour and sugar in a recipe with it. Which, in my mind is a win/win situation.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein Ingredients

    Pumkin Puree

    Apart from it giving these Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein their stunning colour and a lovely flavour, Pumpkin also sneaks in some vegetables. Another “trick” I used during my weight loss period. The generally low caloric density but high fibre of them, help us feeling full as well and gives our bodies the nutrition it needs to function well.
    So I usually try to add both vegetables and fruit to all of my meals.

    Whole wheat flour

    Also for added fibre and nutrition benefits, I’m adding some whole wheat flour. Plus of course its lovely nutty flavour plays really well with the pumpkin. Think “Pumpkin-Pecan” and you know what I mean.

    Spices

    Of course you can’t have pumpkin pancakes without pumpkin spice. So I’m adding some of that too. If you can’t find it, mix your own. It’s a base of 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/8th tsp clove, ¼ tsp allspice and ¼ tsp nutmeg. Since I live in Ireland, where it’s not easily available in supermarkets, I usually mix a bigger batch and keep it in a little container in my spice cupboard.
    Alternatively you could just add cinnamon.

    Raising agents

    While the sourdough itself has raising powers, we want really fluffy pancakes. So I’m adding some baking powder and soda here.
    A note on that: If you leave the pancake batter to ferment overnight, as I often do, only add those right before frying, as they will lose their effectiveness if they stand too long.

    Toppings

    Pancakes without toppings are only half good, aren’t they? Which means I’m adding even more fruit here. For fresh and juicy flavour as much as the benefits they give me. .
    In this case I’m using blueberries, one of my all-time favourites and plums, because their acidity goes just so well with the pumpkin.

    You could use any fruit you enjoy really. Berries, apples, grapes would all go really well with these Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein. Greek yoghurt would be nice too. And of course, as I did here, some cinnamon sugar and/or maple syrup.

    The Process

    Mix the wet and protein

    In a large mixing bowl, combine the sourdough discard, pumpkin puree, egg, coconut oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well until the ingredients are fully incorporated.

    In a protein shaker, vigorously mix the protein powder and soy milk, until there are no lumps left and you have a very creamy mixture. Add to the sourdough mix.

    I often speed this process up by putting the protein powder and all the wet ingredients I can fit into my Nutribullet, just mixing it for a minute, until it’s really creamy.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein Process

    Mix the wet with the dry

    For the next step: You can prepare the batter the evening before, but if you do, leave out the baking powder and soda until the next morning, as it would lose some of its effectiveness overnight.

    In a separate bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, pumpkin spice, baking powder, and fine sea salt.

    Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, stirring gently with a spatula until just combined. Avoid overmixing; a few lumps in the batter are fine.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein Process

    Frying

    Preheat a non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat. If needed, lightly grease the surface with additional coconut oil.

    Once the skillet is hot, pour approximately 1/4 cup of the pancake batter onto the skillet for each pancake. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until bubbles start to form on the surface.

    Carefully flip the pancakes and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until they are golden brown and cooked through.

    If you’d like to keep the stack warm while you fry the rest, keep them on a plate in your oven, set to the lowest temperature.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Meal Prep

    As most of my recipes, Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein are great for meal prep.
    There is the fact that you can prepare the batter, except baking soda and powder, in the evening and it only gets better overnight.

    Once fried, they freeze really well and can be heated through simply in the toaster. I like to keep them in portions in little bags or containers, so I can just grab a super quick and healthy breakfast, when I’m in a hurry.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Looking for other breakfasts with Protein?

    Try my Tiramisu Oats Two ways.

    Or for a savoury breakfast, have a look at the Turkish Eggs with Asparagus. They are a stunning weekend brunch.

    Looking for other sourdough discard ideas with protein?
    Try these:

    Sourdough Protein Pancakes with Wholewheat

    Sourdough Pumpkin Waffles with Protein

    Sourdough Chocolate Banana Bread with Rye and Protein

    Sourdough Brownies with Protein

    Sourdough Buttermilk Protein Pancakes

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein

    Just the breakfast you need for fall, my Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein give you an easy and quick breakfast with hidden veggies from the pumpkin, extra nutrition from the protein powder plus a contrasting slight tang from sourdough discard. The result is a fluffy, satisfying pancake with a bright colour to make you feel all warm and cosy.
    No ratings yet
    Prep Time 10 minutes
    Cook Time 20 minutes
    Total Time 30 minutes
    Course Breakfast
    Cuisine American
    Servings 14 Pancakes
    Calories 125 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 ¾ cup Soy milk or any milk of your choice
    • ½ cup protein powder I used “My Protein” Cinnamon Danish. Vanilla flavour would work too.
    • 3/4 cup Sourdough discard
    • 3/4 cup pumpkin puree
    • 1 large egg
    • 4 tbsp Coconut oil
    • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 1 cup whole wheat flour
    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 1 tsp pumpkin spice or cinnamon
    • 2 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • 1/2 tsp kosher salt

    Optional for topping:

    • Cinnamon sugar
    • Plums
    • Blueberries
    • Maple syrup

    Instructions
     

    Mix the wet and protein

    • In a large mixing bowl, combine the sourdough discard, pumpkin puree, egg, coconut oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well until the ingredients are fully incorporated.
    • In a protein shaker, vigorously mix the protein powder and soy milk, until there are no lumps left and you have a very creamy mixture. Add to the sourdough mix.

    Mix the wet with the dry

    • For the next step: You can prepare the batter the evening before, but if you do, leave out the baking powder and soda until the next morning, as it would lose some of its effectiveness overnight.
    • In a separate bowl, whisk together the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, pumpkin spice, baking powder, and fine sea salt.
    • Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, stirring gently with a spatula until just combined. Avoid overmixing; a few lumps in the batter are fine.

    Frying

    • Preheat a non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat. If needed, lightly grease the surface with additional coconut oil.
    • Once the skillet is hot, pour approximately 1/4 cup of the pancake batter onto the skillet for each pancake. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until bubbles start to form on the surface.
    • Carefully flip the pancakes and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until they are golden brown and cooked through.
    • If you’d like to keep the stack warm while you fry the rest, keep them on a plate in your oven, set to the lowest temperature.

    Notes

    Meal Prep
    As most of my recipes, Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein are great for meal prep.
    There is the fact that you can prepare the batter, except baking soda and powder, in the evening and it only gets better overnight.
    Once fried, they freeze really well and can be heated through simply in the toaster. I like to keep them in portions in little bags or containers, so I can just grab a super quick and healthy breakfast, when I’m in a hurry.
    Pumpkin Sourdough Pancakes (Per Pancake, assuming 14 pancakes):
    Calories: Approximately 120-130 calories per pancake
    Protein: Approximately 4-5 grams per pancake
    Fat: Approximately 4-5 grams per pancake
    Carbohydrates: Approximately 15-17 grams per pancake
    Fiber: Approximately 2-3 grams per pancake
    Sugars: Approximately 2-3 grams per pancake

    Nutrition

    Calories: 125kcal
    Nutrition Facts
    Sourdough Pumpkin Pancakes with Protein
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    125
    % Daily Value*
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Breakfast, Easy, Healthy, High Protein, sourdough
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

    Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein

    Perfect for fall, this easy Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread has added nutrition from protein and pumpkin puree and is studded with raisins. Slightly sweet with molasses, adding a deep caramel-liquorice flavour, the stunning colour will light up your mornings or teatime. You can bake one large loaf or 8 cute small ones, making this a very pretty treat for guests and super quick to prepare.

    Why You Want To Make This

    Have you ever had soda bread and weren’t impressed by its crumbly dry texture and sometime strange aftertaste from the soda? This is your chance to fall in love with it. Just as I did.
    It was so good, I made it twice in a week. Hence one large loaf and 8 small in the pictures.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    Sourdough

    Adding sourdough to soda bread sounds counter-intuitive, doesn’t it? After all there is soda! But trust me here: It adds a gentle tang to your soda bread and makes it slightly less crumbly, softer, and moister. Not to mention the health benefits it adds. You don’t need a long rise here, as we are just using discard. But if you want, you can prepare it in the evening, leave it in the fridge overnight. Then bake it in the morning, which will improve both flavour and structure.
    Don’t add the soda until just before baking, since it will lose its dough raising properties if left for too long.

    Pumpkin Puree

    Pumpkin Puree is hard to find in Ireland I admit. I got mine at an online American Food shop and it was so worth it!
    It lends a gentle sweetness to the Sourdough Soda Bread and adds moisture, so you have a slightly more pillowy structure than usual in this type of bread. Not to mention the stunning orange colour, that just makes you want to light your pumpkin spice candles and have this with a nice cup of tea. Or coffee.

    Protein Powder

    A rather unusual ingredient in soda bread, but I try to add protein wherever I can, as I found I’m eating way too little if I don’t watch my intake.
    It replaces part of the white flour, which is always a plus and adds protein instead.
    I’m using MyProtein Cinnamon Danish here (Neither sponsored nor affiliated), as the cinnamon goes so well with the pumpkin.

    A Note on Protein Powder:

    I have tried several in the last year, starting with vegan and was nearly put off protein powders forever, it tasted so horrible. The weird chalky texture ruined everything it came into contact with, so I had to throw it out.

    Being lactose intolerant when it comes to any unfermented milk products, I was a bit sceptical, if I could use whey protein, but it turned out it not only tastes much better, but my body had no complaints whatsoever.
    Yet, the first few I tried were only marginally better than the vegan stuff, still having a strange aftertaste, the sweetener clearly noticeable and a floury texture.

    I was about to give up and only try and sneak them into smoothies, which seemed the only palatable option at that point (and I’m not a fan of smoothies unfortunately, with it being always cold in Ireland). Enter MyProtein. Ordering from them was a last ditch effort, to find a protein powder I could actually drink as shake and boy was I in for a surprise!

    I had gotten their Jelly Belly Buttered Popcorn special edition and the first sniff was already promising. Once I tried that super creamy, buttery, sweet tasting shake, reminding me of really good vanilla custard, I was hooked. And lots of recipes to make with this popped into my mind.

    This protein powder is not something you try to hide in whatever you are making, but rather an ingredient that elevates your food. Use it in the right ratio (in baked goods you can replace for example ¼ of the flour with it, while saving on sugar too) and you have a real treat.

    To prevent any lumps, make sure to pre-mix with wet ingredients and it’s an amazing addition to many sweet recipes.

    Substitution for protein powder

    You could replace it 1:1 with flour if you don’t want or have it, but it also adds sweetness to the dough, so you might want to compensate by adding a bit of sugar.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein Ingredients

    Flour

    Soda Bread can be made with any flour. I’m using 2 cups plain white and 1.5 cups fine whole wheat flour here, to add some nutty flavour and fibre, but still get a nice, soft dough that lets the bright orange from the pumpkin shine through.
    You could use bread flour, but soda bread doesn’t really need the gluten, as it’s supposed to have a slightly more cake-like structure. Though I found it can benefit from being left in the fridge overnight, to gain a bit of structure and depth of flavour.

    Buttermilk

    This is essential for the soda to react, as it needs some type of acid to develop its raising properties. It also adds a delicious tang to the dough, which can be a bit bland if made without buttermilk.

    Baking powder and soda

    A mix of baking powder and soda means you don’t run the risk of having a strange….how do I say it politely…ah, yes, I don’t: Fishy taste. Apologies to the Irish people who are proud of their soda bread. But that’s really what keeps putting me off it the most. The weird flavour and smell you get from just soda to help raise your bread. And then I’m supposed to put jam on it? *shivers*
    Using a mix here neutralises that risk and gives you a really lovely raise and structure.

    Butter

    The butter added here isn’t traditional either, but again adds moisture and a gentle chewiness that traditional soda breads are lacking.

    Molasses

    My first soda bread with molasses and raisins many years ago was a revelation. Suddenly there was so much flavour in what I often perceived as basically non-sweetened cake!
    Molasses, with its complex flavour profile and deep, almost liquorice sweetness, balanced the gentle pumpkin sweetness and plays exceptionally well with our next ingredient

    Raisins

    I know, this one is controversial, and keep hearing people hate raisins nearly as much as Marmite. I love both. You can leave them out of course, but the little juicy bites really add excitement to this fall soda bread and go so well with the pumpkin and molasses. Give them a chance!

    Pumpkin Spice

    Looking at my ingredients picture, I clearly forgot to add this in the photo, but I assure you, it’s in the bread. I’m just slightly scatter-brained. I’m clearly getting old.

    Again, being in Ireland makes getting pumpkin spice a challenge. But thankfully you can very easily mix it yourself. It’s a base of 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/8th tsp clove, ¼ tsp allspice and ¼ tsp nutmeg.
    I made a larger amount recently, to keep in my spice cupboard, as I got a bit obsessed with pumpkin recipes.

    The Process

    Sourdough Soda Bread is as easy as it gets really. 15min and your bread can be in the oven. Which makes this the ideal one for short notice guests or “I really want bread but don’t want to go to the shops”. Better tasting too I have to add.

    Let’s get to it, shall we?

    Mix the protein powder with the wet ingredients

    Since I have my Nutribullet, I got into the habit of mixing my wet ingredients and protein powder in it, as it’s just so easy. But you can use a blender, a hand mixer or simply a whisk and elbow grease and it will be fine.
    If using a Nutribullet or similar blender, you can also add the butter here, as it will save you working it into the flour later.
    Add your pumpkin puree, buttermilk, sourdough discard and protein powder to your blender or bowl and thoroughly mix, until you have a creamy and delicious looking orange cream without any lumps.

    Mix the wet into the dry

    If you are preparing this in the evening, leave out the baking soda and powder, to add it right before baking, as it will lose its effectiveness overnight.

    For baking straight away, pre-heat your oven now to 175°C (350°F).

    Line a baking try with parchment or grease your mini bread tins with melted butter. Flour them lightly, so you’ll have an easy time getting out the mini loafs later.

    If you plan to bake the Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread straight away, mix baking soda and powder with the flour. Add the spices, salt, soft butter, the creamy protein-pumpkin mix, and raisins, giving it a stir with a wooden spoon, to incorporate it all.

    Now, with wet hands, as the dough will be very sticky, give it a quick knead, to make sure no flour lumps remain.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein Process

    Prepare the dough depending on your baking method:

    Shape your dough into one large loaf. It’ll look a bit rough, which is what we are going for, as those dough spikes that are standing up now make the most deliciously crunchy crust later.

    With a sharp knife, cut about 1in deep across the loaf in a cross pattern, so you get 6-8 triangle shaped sections. This will help the bread rise and make it easier to divide it later, as soda bread can be a bit crumbly to cut.

    For mini loafs, divide the dough equally into 8 mini loafs in your tin. With a sharp knife, cut a slit down the length of the loafs, to help them rise and have them look like bread.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    Now you can sprinkle it with a bit of brown cinnamon sugar if you like. I found the caramelised sugar really improves the flavour and crunch, so I recommend it. Just mix 1 tbsp demerara sugar with ½ tsp cinnamon and sprinkle over the bread.

    Baking

    For a large loaf, bake 45-50 minutes, rotating once at around 20min, if your oven bakes unevenly.
    You can test for doneness by either checking of your loaf is at 100°C (200°F) in the centre with a thermometer or tap the bottom. If it sounds hollow and is nicely golden brown, your Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein is done.

     

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    For mini loafs, bake around 20-23 minutes, rotating at about 10min, if your oven bakes unevenly. Check the doneness as above. Alternatively insert a wooden skewer in the middle. If it comes out clean without sticky crumbs, your Mini Sourdough Soda Breads are done.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    Let the bread cool a bit, otherwise it might be sticking to your knife.
    Enjoy with cold butter and/or jam. I particularly loved it with apricot jam.

    Meal Prep

    Preparing this the evening before (adding soda and baking powder right before baking) makes this an excellent choice for meal prep.

    After baking, due to the relatively high moisture content, this lasts about 3 days in your bread tin and about 5 days in the fridge.

    Freeze and Reheat

    When baked, you can freeze half the loaf or the mini loafs. I find the mini loafs particularly perfect, as you can grab as many as you need from your freezer and just quickly heat them in air fryer or oven for a few minutes and you’ll have fresh Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein any time you want.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    Looking for more pumpkin recipes?
    Try my tempting Sourdough Pumpkin S’mores Cookies.
    Or these delicious Sourdough Pumpkin Waffles with Protein.

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share. It helps me a lot.

    Sourdough Soda Bread with Pumpkin and Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein

    Perfect for fall, this easy Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein has added nutrition from protein and pumpkin spice and is studded with raisins. Slightly sweet with molasses, adding a deep caramel-liquorice flavour, the stunning colour will light up your mornings or teatime. You can bake one large loaf or 8 cute small ones, making this a very pretty treat for guests and super quick to prepare.
    No ratings yet
    Prep Time 15 minutes
    Cook Time 50 minutes
    Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
    Course Bread, Breakfast, Dessert, Side Dish, Snack
    Cuisine American, Irish
    Servings 8
    Calories 400 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 cup sourdough discard
    • ¾ cup pumpkin puree
    • ¾ cup buttermilk
    • ½ cup protein powder. Vanilla or cinnamon flavour are ideal
    • 1 tbsp molasses
    • 3 tbsp soft not melted butter
    • 2 cups plain white flour
    • 1 ½ cups fine whole wheat flour
    • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
    • ½ tsp baking soda
    • 2 tsp pumpkin spice or a mix of 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/8th tsp clove, ¼ tsp allspice and ¼ tsp nutmeg
    • 1 cup raisins

    Optional for sprinkling:

    • 1 tbsp demerara sugar
    • ½ tsp cinnamon

    Instructions
     

    Prepare Wet Ingredients:

    • If you have a Nutribullet or similar blender, use it for this step. Otherwise, you can use a blender, hand mixer, or a whisk.
    • Combine pumpkin puree, buttermilk, sourdough discard, protein powder, and molasses in a blender or mixing bowl. Blend or mix thoroughly until you achieve a creamy and lump-free orange mixture. If using a blender, you can add the soft butter at this stage to incorporate it into the mixture.

    Mix Wet into Dry Ingredients:

    • If you plan to bake immediately, proceed to preheat your oven to 175°C (350°F).
    • In a separate bowl, combine the white flour, whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, pumpkin spice, and a pinch of salt. Add the soft butter, the creamy protein-pumpkin mixture, and raisins to the dry ingredients. Stir with a wooden spoon to incorporate everything. The dough will be sticky. Using wet hands, quickly knead the dough to ensure there are no remaining flour lumps.

    Prepare the Dough:

    • Depending on your preferred baking method, shape the dough accordingly.

    For a large loaf:

    • Shape the dough into one large, rough loaf. The textured surface will create a deliciously crunchy crust. Use a sharp knife to make a 1-inch deep cross pattern on the top, dividing the loaf into 6-8 triangle-shaped sections. This helps the bread rise and facilitates easier dividing later.

    For mini loafs:

    • Divide the dough equally into 8 portions and place them in your mini bread tins. Use a sharp knife to cut a slit down the length of each mini loaf to assist in rising and for a decorative touch.

    Optional Topping:

    • Sprinkle a mixture of 1 tbsp demerara sugar and ½ tsp cinnamon over the dough. This caramelized sugar adds flavor and crunch to the bread.

    Baking:

      For a large loaf:

      • Bake for 45-50 minutes, rotating the loaf once around the 20-minute mark if your oven heats unevenly. Check for doneness by either inserting a thermometer into the center (it should read 100°C or 200°F) or tapping the bottom of the loaf. If it sounds hollow and is golden brown, it's done.

      For mini loafs:

      • Bake for around 20-23 minutes, rotating the tins at about 10 minutes if necessary. Check for doneness by inserting a wooden skewer into the center of a mini loaf. If it comes out clean without sticky crumbs, the mini sourdough soda breads are done.

      Serving:

      • Allow the bread to cool for a while before slicing and serving. Enjoy your homemade SSourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein!
      • It’s amazing with cold butter and jam, or just on its own with a cup of tea or coffee. Or pumpkin spice latte/Chai, if you want to go all out.

      Notes

      Meal Prep
      Preparing this the evening before (adding soda and baking powder right before baking) makes this an excellent choice for meal prep.
      After baking, due to the relatively high moisture content, this lasts about 3 days in your bread tin and about 5 days in the fridge.
      When baked, you can freeze half the loaf or the mini loafs. I find the mini loafs particularly perfect, as you can grab as many as you need from your freezer and just quickly heat them in air fryer or oven for a few minutes and you’ll have fresh Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein any time you want.
      Calories: Approximately 375-440 calories per serving
      Protein: Approximately 12-14 grams per serving
      Fat: Approximately 5-7 grams per serving
      Carbohydrates: Approximately 75-85 grams per serving
      Fiber: Approximately 6-8 grams per serving
      Sugars: Approximately 20-25 grams per serving

      Nutrition

      Calories: 400kcal
      Nutrition Facts
      Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein
      Amount per Serving
      Calories
      400
      % Daily Value*
      * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
      Keyword Breakfast, Easy, Protein, sourdough, Vegetarian
      Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!