Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse

    This Cashew Chocolate Mousse tastes just like a really good Mousse au Chocolate from France but is made with Cashews instead of cream and eggs. Using just 5 ingredients and a high speed blender, this makes a super indulgent, yet healthy and high protein chocolate mousse in 5 minutes.

     

    Why You Will Love This

     

    Lactose Free

    Using cashews and protein powder instead of cream and eggs makes this vegan (if you are using vegan protein powder and chocolate that is), lactose free and utterly delicious.

    Secretly Healthy

    I bet if you serve this to your guests, they will have absolutely no idea they are eating something that is actually good for them. The Cashews add healthy fats, magnesium and a good dose of protein on their own. Then we add protein powder for even more nutrition.

    Deeply Chocolatey

    While you could just use raw cacao powder to keep this in the realm of whole foods, I wanted a really indulgent Mousse au Chocolate experience, which I feel you only get by using melted chocolate. I used 70% cocoa content, which keeps this still in the “good for you realm” if enjoyed with reason. But then, sometimes too much of a good thing can be wonderful.

    Super Quick

    While you’d ideally soak the cashews in hot water for about 30 minutes, unless you have a Vitamix or similar high speed blender, the actual process couldn’t be quicker. 1-2 minutes of blending and your Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse is ready to enjoy.
    Leave it in the fridge for a while and it will get even thicker and closer to “real” Mousse au Chocolate.

    Adaptable

    Add flavourings – You can take this into lots of different directions flavour wise. I love to add some amaretto, giving it a hint of almond flavour, really bringing out the nutty notes of chocolate. A teaspoon of instant espresso, to emphasize it even more is welcome too.
    Or you might go into the After Eight direction, by adding just a drop or two of mint oil or mint liqueur.
    Grate some orange zest into it, to get the dark chocolate-orange flavour, or add fresh raspberries for a fruity kick.

    Use different nuts – I’ve made this with different ratios of cashews and almonds, but find it comes out smoothest with just cashews. Though the almonds do add a lovely flavour component, so I encourage you to experiment with it if you like.

    Use different liquid to nut ratio – If you like your Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse on the even richer side, add less plant milk, which will result in an incredibly dense and indulgent consistency. Less mousse like, more like a chocolate pie filling, which it can be used for as well.

    Use different Chocolate – You can absolutely make this with milk or white chocolate if you prefer. Just be mindful that this will add more sugar and fat content.

    The Ingredients

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse_Ingredients

     

    Cashews – When you soak and blend cashews with some liquid, they make an incredible cream you can use for all sorts of things. Either go the savoury route with dressings or aioli or the sweet one, with this like this Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse.
    All you need for the magic to happen is a high speed blender. The one I have is a simple Nutribullet, which you can easily get for about 100€ on Amazon.

    Dark Chocolate – You can use any chocolate here, but I love 70% cocoa content dark chocolate. Vegan works well, so does the classic version.

    Plant milk – To get cashews to blend really smooth and of course add volume and lightness to your Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse you’ll need some sort of liquid. You could probably use even water, but I love plant milks for their creaminess. This time I used coconut milk (the drinking version), but any plant milk will work and add its own characteristics. Use an unsweetened one you enjoy.

    Dates – To sweeten the Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse I’m adding dates. This also keeps it refined sugar free (if using unsweetened plant milk) and adds some more fibre.

    Protein Powder – Use any protein powder you enjoy. Obviously chocolate flavour works best as it enhances the characteristics. But vanilla or, say coffee would work nicely too. You can use vegan protein powder here, though personally I love MyProtein Whey, even though I’m lactose intolerant. I don’t feel any adverse effects from it at all.

    Optional additions – A pinch of salt is a good idea in any dessert, more so in this Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse. It lifts the flavour and adds that little something.
    Instant espresso powder is another one doing a very similar thing. It’s not strictly necessary, but really deepens the dark chocolate flavour. You won’t taste coffee (unless you add a lot).

    Amaretto is a piece I took from the first Mousse au Chocolate I ever made, which was this one from Jamie Oliver.
    Until I made this Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse, it was the best I ever had. And that’s saying a lot, considering I lived in France for a year and tasted my way through lots of different ones.

     

    The Process

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse_Process

    Soak the Cashews (and, if using, almonds) for about 30min in freshly boiled water. You could probably skip this step if you have a Vitamix, but I feel it adds creaminess.

    Melt the chocolate gently in the microwave in 30 second bursts, stirring in between.

    Add all ingredients to your blender and blend until smooth.

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse_Process

    Transfer to pretty jars or a lidded container and keep in the fridge until ready to enjoy.

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse_Process

    Serve with topped with fresh raspberries or cashew cream.

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse

    How to Store

     

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse keeps in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please rate, share and/or comment. It helps me a lot!

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse

    This Cashew Chocolate Mousse tastes just like a really good Mousse au Chocolate from France but is made with Cashews instead of cream and eggs. Using just 5 ingredients and a high speed blender, this makes a super indulgent tasting, yet healthy and high protein chocolate mousse in 5 minutes.
    5 from 14 votes
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Nut Soaking time 30 minutes
    Total Time 35 minutes
    Course Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine Fusion
    Servings 6
    Calories 253 kcal

    Equipment

    • High Speed Blender

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 cup cashews or a mix of cashews and almonds
    • 1 1/2 cups unsweetened almond milk or plant milk of your choice
    • 5 dates pitted
    • 3.5 oz (100g) 70% chocolate melted
    • 2 scoops protein powder I used MyProtein Whey. Ideally chocolate flavoured.
    • 1 Pinch of salt optional but recommended
    • 1 tsp instant espresso powder optional
    • 1 tbsp Amaretto optional

    Instructions
     

    • Soak the Cashews (and Almonds if using): Place the cashews (and almonds, if using) in a bowl and cover them with freshly boiled water. Let them soak for about 30 minutes. This step adds creaminess to the mousse.
    • Melt the Chocolate: Gently melt the 70% chocolate in the microwave in 30-second bursts, stirring in between each burst until the chocolate is completely melted. Set aside.
    • Prepare the Blender: Drain the soaked cashews (and almonds) and discard the soaking water. Add them to the blender.
    • Add Ingredients to Blender: To the blender with the soaked cashews, add the unsweetened almond milk, dates, melted chocolate, protein powder, pinch of salt (if using), instant espresso powder (if using), and Amaretto (if using).
    • Blend Until Smooth: Blend all the ingredients together until you achieve a smooth and creamy consistency. This might take a few minutes, depending on the power of your blender. Scrape down the sides of the blender if necessary to ensure all ingredients are well incorporated.
    • Transfer and Chill: Once the mixture is smooth, transfer the chocolate mousse into pretty jars or a lidded container. Cover with a lid or wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to enjoy. Chilling the mousse will help it set and develop its flavor.
    • Serve: When ready to serve, top the protein cashew chocolate mousse with fresh raspberries or a dollop of cashew cream for an extra touch of decadence.

    Notes

    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse keeps in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 253kcalCarbohydrates: 20gProtein: 6gFat: 17gSaturated Fat: 6gPolyunsaturated Fat: 2gMonounsaturated Fat: 8gTrans Fat: 0.01gCholesterol: 1mgSodium: 94mgPotassium: 306mgFiber: 3gSugar: 10gVitamin A: 8IUVitamin C: 0.1mgCalcium: 99mgIron: 3mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Protein Cashew Chocolate Mousse
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    253
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    17
    g
    26
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    6
    g
    38
    %
    Trans Fat
     
    0.01
    g
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    2
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    8
    g
    Cholesterol
     
    1
    mg
    0
    %
    Sodium
     
    94
    mg
    4
    %
    Potassium
     
    306
    mg
    9
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    20
    g
    7
    %
    Fiber
     
    3
    g
    13
    %
    Sugar
     
    10
    g
    11
    %
    Protein
     
    6
    g
    12
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    8
    IU
    0
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    0.1
    mg
    0
    %
    Calcium
     
    99
    mg
    10
    %
    Iron
     
    3
    mg
    17
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, For Guests, Healthy, High Protein, meal prep, vegan, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars

    These Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars taste like one of my all-time favourite chocolates called “Yogurette” but are infinitely better for you.
    Packed full of protein, fresh strawberries and 0% fat Greek yoghurt, encased in an irresistible dark chocolate shell, they are exactly the snack I want after a sweaty workout!

     

    Why You Will Love This

     

    Amazing way of getting your protein

     

    I’m not sure about you, but I’m not particularly fond of the protein bars you can buy. They all taste oddly stodgy to me (although the protein wafers I recently found were pretty good!) and are not really what I crave after a workout that has me hot, exhausted, and craving something that just feels both cooling and healthy.

    That’s where these Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars come into play. They have only 7 ingredients (more about them below) take 10 minutes to make plus some cooling time and taste like really fresh and healthy strawberry yoghurt with a crisp dark chocolate coating.

    Each of them comes with about 5g protein and just 40 calories.

    Know exactly what’s in them

     

    Making your protein bars at home means you know exactly what goes into them. No preservatives, no fillers. Just protein powder, yoghurt, fruit and chocolate.

    The Perfect Ice Cream Bar

     

    Did you ever want an ice cream bar that’s also good for you? This is the one.
    All the benefits of yoghurt with its calcium and probiotics .
    Plus the much needed protein to build muscle, keep your bones healthy and reduce cravings
    And of course the fibre and antioxidants of fresh strawberries, which we are using in two different forms here, these bars are a nutritional powerhouse.
    Oh and dare I say it? Dark chocolate (within reason) is also pretty beneficial in its own right, containing lots of minerals and even reducing inflammation. But mainly: It makes me really happy to eat it.

    Super Easy to Make

     

    My Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars comes together within minutes. You don’t need any special equipment, though a blender like a Nutribullet is helpful for getting strawberry puree. But mashing them with a fork works fine too.

    The rest is just a quick stir, transfer into a freezer proof flat container, wait a bit, cut into pieces and quickly coat with melted dark chocolate. A tiny bit more patience while they freeze again and you have your post workout (or anytime really) snacks ready for the week.

     

    The Ingredients

     

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Ingredients

     

    Lets start with the obvious one: Protein Powder. I used MyProtein Strawberry here and loved it. But a good quality vanilla flavoured one will do just fine.

    The strawberry flavour comes from both fresh and freeze dried strawberries. While you could use just fresh, I found that the tiny nuggets of freeze dried strawberries give these bars their striking resemblance to Yogurette, with their intense bursts of flavour in your mouth.

    I found mine in snack packets from Holland & Barrett and (yes, you may call me a bit weird, but we gotta work with what we find) took 5 minutes to separate the strawberry from the peaches.
    If you find them on their own, even better. Or just use the combo. I’m fairly sure the added peach will be delicious too. If you try it, let me know your thoughts!

    One note on freeze dried fruit: They are like sponges soaking up any humidity in the air quickly. So chop them last minute before adding and keep the ones for decorating in an airtight container. Otherwise you’ll have a sticky clump instead of nicely defined crunchy pieces. Have a wild guess how I found out…

    Fat free Greek yoghurt adds the classic Yogurette flavour base of course. You could use full fat, but personally I feel the protein powder adds so much creaminess, it’s just not necessary.

    A tiny bit of honey and lemon juice round out the flavour and of course dark chocolate to coat them. I used a 70% dark chocolate here. I tried both Lindt and the Madagascar 70% from Lidl and loved them equally.

     

    The Process

     

    First clean and roughly chop your fresh strawberries. Either mash them with a fork or puree them for a few seconds in a blender.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Process

    Finely chop your freeze dried strawberries. Put a few aside for decorating later if you like.

     

    In a medium bowl, mix all your ingredients except the dark chocolate until creamy and well combined.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Process

    Line a freezer proof container with a flat base with parchment paper, so you can easily take out and cut the whole thing later. Don’t skip the parchment paper, or you’ll have to scrape out the filling and eat it like ice cream. I mean…not that this would be the worst thing in the world. You can absolutely skip the chocolate covering and do that.
    I use a medium sized Pyrex dish about 15x 7in, in which the Strawberry protein filling came up about 0.7in. But honestly, no need for exact science in this. Use what you have and cut them later.

    Pour your Strawberry-protein cream into the prepared dish and freeze for at least 3h or until very solid. You’ll need it extremely cold to be able to coat it with chocolate.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Process

    When it’s frozen, take it out onto a chopping board and cut into bars with a sharp hot, but dry knife. I dipped mine into hot water in between cuts, then dried it with a towel, to avoid water crystals on the bars.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Process

    Put back into your container and freeze while you melt the chocolate.

    Break or chop your dark chocolate and add to a microwave safe bowl. If you enjoy a slightly softer coating, you could add a teaspoon of coconut oil, but I love my bars really crisp, so I left it out.

    Melt in quick 30 second bursts in the microwave, stirring in between or over a water bath on the stove, being careful that the bowl with the chocolate doesn’t touch the water. Stir until melted and creamy.

    Transfer to a deep plate with flat bottom, so your bars can lie flat in the chocolate.

    Line a small tray that fits into your freezer with parchment paper.

    Take your Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars out of the freezer and, using 2 forks, quickly turn each one in the hot chocolate until fully coated, let the excess drip off and transfer to the prepared parchment lined tray.

    If you want to decorate them with the freeze dried strawberry pieces, you gotta be quick and do it immediately after taking each bar out of the chcolate bath, as the chocolate will harden extremely fast. You want the pieces to stick to the just soft enough chocolate before it’s all crisp.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars_Process

    Put back into the freezer for an hour or so, before trying one. I found they taste best, if you give them a few minutes at room temperature to soften the inside just a little.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars

    Enjoy your homemade healthy Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars.

    Storing

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars keep well in the freezer in a lidded container for up to 3 months. Not that there is any hope they will last that long. But you might want to make double, so they last a few weeks.

    Looking for More Protein Rich Snacks?

    Here are some ideas:
    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein

    Sourdough Pumpkin Soda Bread with Protein

    Protein Creme Brulee Two Ways

    Sourdough Chocolate Banana Bread with Rye and Protein

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please rate, share, and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars

    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars

    These Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars taste like one of my all-time favourite chocolates called “Yogurette” but are infinitely better for you. Packed full of protein, fresh strawberries and 0% fat Greek yoghurt, encased in an irresistible dark chocolate shell, they are exactly the snack I want after a sweaty workout!
    5 from 8 votes
    Prep Time 10 minutes
    Cooling time 1 hour
    Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
    Course Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine American
    Servings 16
    Calories 39 kcal

    Equipment

    • Blender or fork to puree/mash strawberries

    Ingredients
      

    • 1 cup fresh strawberries to make about ½ cup pureed
    • 3/4 cup protein powder I used MyProtein Whey Strawberry, but a good vanilla flavoured one will work fine too.
    • 1 cup 0% fat Greek yoghurt
    • 0.7 oz 20g freeze dried strawberries finely chopped
    • 7 oz chocolate 70% cocoa content (or whatever kind you enjoy)
    • 3 tsp honey
    • 1 tbsp lemon juice

    Instructions
     

    Prepare:

    • Line a freezer-proof container with parchment paper, ensuring the base is covered. This will allow for easy removal and cutting of the bars later.
    • Clean and roughly chop the fresh strawberries. Mash them with a fork or puree them in a blender until smooth.
    • Finely chop the freeze-dried strawberries. Set aside a small portion for decorating if desired.

    Mix Ingredients:

    • In a medium bowl, combine the pureed fresh strawberries, protein powder, Greek yogurt, finely chopped freeze-dried strawberries, honey, and lemon juice. Mix until creamy and well combined.
    • Pour the strawberry-protein mixture into the prepared container. Spread it evenly and freeze for at least 3 hours or until very solid.

    Coat with Chocolate:

    • Once frozen, remove the mixture from the container onto a chopping board. Use a sharp, hot, and dry knife to cut it into bars. Dip the knife into hot water between cuts and dry it with a towel to prevent water crystals on the bars. Return the bars to the container and freeze while preparing the chocolate coating.
    • Break or chop the dark chocolate and place it in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave in 30-second bursts, stirring in between, until melted and creamy. Alternatively, melt the chocolate over a water bath on the stove, ensuring the bowl doesn’t touch the water.

    Notes

    These bars keep well frozen in a freezer proof container or bag for up to 3 months.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 39kcalCarbohydrates: 4gProtein: 5gFat: 0.4gSaturated Fat: 0.1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.01gMonounsaturated Fat: 0.004gCholesterol: 9mgSodium: 12mgPotassium: 43mgFiber: 0.2gSugar: 4gVitamin A: 15IUVitamin C: 6mgCalcium: 18mgIron: 0.4mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Strawberry Yoghurt Protein Bars
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    39
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    0.4
    g
    1
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    0.1
    g
    1
    %
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    0.01
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    0.004
    g
    Cholesterol
     
    9
    mg
    3
    %
    Sodium
     
    12
    mg
    1
    %
    Potassium
     
    43
    mg
    1
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    4
    g
    1
    %
    Fiber
     
    0.2
    g
    1
    %
    Sugar
     
    4
    g
    4
    %
    Protein
     
    5
    g
    10
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    15
    IU
    0
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    6
    mg
    7
    %
    Calcium
     
    18
    mg
    2
    %
    Iron
     
    0.4
    mg
    2
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, fruit, Healthy, High Protein, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Vegan Satay Noodles

    Vegan Satay Noodles

    You know this craving when only deliciously peanutty Vegan Satay Noodles will do?
    The creamy peanut sauce with lots of umami, slightly sweet with a bit of spice, that just feels so incredibly cozy like a hug on a plate. Add to it the fact that peanuts give you a good bit of protein and join the whole thing up with lots of veggies in different forms and you have yourself a dinner that’s as quick as it is good for you.

     

    Why You Will Love This

     

    Simple to make

    If you ever had chicken Satay, you know how utterly addictive that peanut butter sauce is. And probably wondered about its secrets. There really aren’t many, which is probably the best thing about it. The whole dish comes together in about 30 minutes, which makes this very doable even on a busy day.

    Flexible

    Both noodle and veggies wise, Vegan Satay Noodles are classic case of “use whatever you have at home”. It’s a great way to use up any odds and ends in your veggie drawer or and sort of noodles you have in your store cupboard.

    If you don’t have peanut butter (or are allergic) you can use Tahini or almond butter. Sure, it’ll taste different, but just as delicious.

    Want to add more protein? Top with some crispy fried tofu or chicken. Beef or lamb work well too if you are not vegan. Or even halloumi for a vegetarian option.

    Nutritious

    With the ratio of vegetables to noodles I’m using here, you easily get all 5 of your 5-a-day in one portion, including all the fibre and vitamins that come with whatever combination you choose.
    Peanut butter adds healthy fats and protein, while the noodles give you satisfying carbs.

    Leftovers are great cold

    Most noodles, soba in particular, will make this dish taste fantastic cold. So you could eat it hot for dinner one day, then take the leftovers to work and eat them cold (or may I suggest a picnic in the spring sun?) the next day.

    The Ingredients

    Noodles, as the name says, are of course included, but I use a little trick with a spiraliser to cut down on carbs.
    Mixing in spiralised zucchini and carrots, sneaks in a good portion of veggies right with the noodles, so even kids will enjoy them.

    Vegan Satay Noodles_Ingredients

    To add even more nutrition, colour, and flavour, I’m using my beloved red cabbage, tenderstem broccoli, thinly sliced sweet red peppers and bright green spring onions to top the plate.

    The satay sauce comes together mainly from store cupboard ingredients like peanut butter, balsamic vinegar (or, even better if you have it, black rice vinegar, which tastes like the Asian version of balsamic vinegar I feel), soy sauce (or coconut aminos), honey or maple syrup and some sweet chili sauce if you like.

    I also add a bit of minced garlic and grated ginger, but you can either leave it out or use them from jars you’ll find in the Asian section of most supermarkets these days. They are a really great shortcut for adding a ton of flavour without the work.

    Toppings, while optional, really make this dish sing. I like a squeeze of lime juice over mine, sliced spring onions, some crunchy chopped peanuts or sesame seeds, a bit of cilantro (or parsley, if you have the “Cilantro tastes like soap” gene) and, if you are feeling spicy, a bit of chili crisp or more sweet chili sauce.

     

    The Process

     

    Prepare you vegetables as per ingredient list and set aside while you make the peanut sauce.

    For the sauce, simply stir together all the ingredients in a small bowl. It will later be thinned a bit by adding some of the noodle cooking water, just like for other pasta sauces.

    Vegan Satay Noodles_Process

     

    Get a large pot of salted water to the boil, add your noodles, and cook according to packet instructions. Before draining them, scoop out some of the cooking water and set aside to add to the sauce later.

    Get a wok or large pan, adding a bit of groundnut or olive oil and gently fry ginger and garlic until fragrant but not browned. Tip in the shredded cabbage, followed by the broccoli and fry for 2-3 minutes until slightly softened. Add the remaining vegetables and quickly stir fry until hot, but still crisp with a bit of bite.

    Now let the noodles join the veggies in your wok and top with the satay sauce, stirring and thinning with a bit of the cooking water, until it reaches a creamy consistency.

    Taste and adjust the seasoning to your liking.

    Serve in a large deep plate, topped with spring onions, chopped roasted peanuts, sesame, herbs and maybe some chili crisp if you like.

    Vegan Satay Noodles

    How to Store

     

    Leftovers keep well in the fridge for up to 3 days and are fantastic cold as a salad. I always make a big portion to have a healthy and delicious dinner for my workdays.

    Looking for more veggie packed dinners, that give you all of your 5-a-day in one portion?
    Here are some ideas:

    Poke Sushi Bowls 4 Ways

    Quick Massaman Lamb Curry with Veggies

    Asian Bowl with Cauliflower and Tofu

    Black Garlic Pork Ramen

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?
    If you enjoyed this recipe, please rate, share and/or comment. It helps me a lot!

    Vegan Satay Noodles

    Vegan Satay Noodles

    You know this craving when only deliciously peanutty Vegan Satay Noodles will do? The creamy umami, slightly sweet with a bit of spice sauce, that just feels so incredibly cozy like a hug on a plate. Add to it the fact that peanuts give you a good bit of protein and join the whole thing up with lots of veggies in different forms and you have yourself a dinner that’s as quick as it is good for you.
    5 from 21 votes
    Prep Time 15 minutes
    Cook Time 15 minutes
    Total Time 30 minutes
    Course Dinner, lunch, Main Course
    Cuisine Asian, Fusion
    Servings 6
    Calories 242 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    Sauce

    • ¼ cup peanut butter I used smooth
    • 2-3 tbsp soy sauce or coconut aminos
    • 1-2 tbsp black rice vinegar or balsamic vinegar
    • 1 tbsp sweet chili sauce or any other hot sauce you enjoy
    • 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey
    • 1 clove garlic minced
    • 2 tsp ginger grated
    • 2 tbsp Oil for frying. I used groundnut.

    Veggies and Noodles

    • 7 oz (200g) noodles I used medium egg noodles
    • 1 zucchini spiralised or thinly sliced
    • 3 carrots spiralised or julienned
    • ¼ red cabbage thinly sliced
    • 7 oz (200g) tenderstem broccoli dry ends cut off
    • 1 red pepper julienned
    • 3 spring onions thinly sliced
    • 1 tbsp peanuts, roasted and chopped optional
    • 1 tbsp sesame optional

    Instructions
     

    • Prepare all your vegetables as per the ingredient list and set them aside while you make the peanut sauce.
    • In a small bowl, mix together the peanut butter, soy sauce or coconut aminos, black rice vinegar (or balsamic), sweet chili sauce, maple syrup or honey, minced garlic, and grated ginger to make the sauce. Set aside.
    • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. Before draining, reserve some of the cooking water for later use.
    • In a wok or large pan, heat a bit of groundnut or olive oil over medium heat. Add the minced garlic and grated ginger, stirring until fragrant but not browned.
    • Add the shredded cabbage to the wok, followed by the tenderstem broccoli, and stir-fry for 2-3 minutes until slightly softened.
    • Add the remaining vegetables (zucchini, carrots, red pepper) to the wok and quickly stir-fry until hot, but still crisp with a bit of bite.
    • Add the cooked noodles to the wok, then pour the satay sauce over the noodles and vegetables. Stir well, thinning the sauce with a bit of the reserved noodle cooking water until it reaches a creamy consistency.
    • Taste the noodles and adjust the seasoning according to your liking.
    • Serve the vegan satay noodles in a large deep plate, topped with sliced spring onions, chopped roasted peanuts, sesame seeds, fresh herbs, and optionally, some chili crisp for extra heat.

    Notes

    How to Store
    Leftovers keep well in the fridge for up to 3 days and are fantastic cold as a salad. I always make a big portion to have a healthy and delicious dinner for my workdays.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 242kcalCarbohydrates: 40gProtein: 9gFat: 6gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gSodium: 548mgPotassium: 379mgFiber: 4gSugar: 9gVitamin A: 5117IUVitamin C: 84mgCalcium: 68mgIron: 1mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Vegan Satay Noodles
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    242
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    6
    g
    9
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    1
    g
    6
    %
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    1
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    3
    g
    Sodium
     
    548
    mg
    24
    %
    Potassium
     
    379
    mg
    11
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    40
    g
    13
    %
    Fiber
     
    4
    g
    17
    %
    Sugar
     
    9
    g
    10
    %
    Protein
     
    9
    g
    18
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    5117
    IU
    102
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    84
    mg
    102
    %
    Calcium
     
    68
    mg
    7
    %
    Iron
     
    1
    mg
    6
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, Healthy, High Fibre, meal prep, Protein, vegan, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways

    Protein Rice Pudding has all the creamy decadence of the popular dessert, but with a healthy dose of protein. I’ve created 4 versions for you to choose from with different add-ins and toppings, so you have a healthy post workout meal ready for you any day.
    On top of that, if you have an instant pot, this can be ready for you in the time you take a shower. No stirring and standing at the hob required!

     

    Why You Will Love This

     

    Instant Pot for Instant gratification

    I’ve always loved the rice pudding my mom made for me when I was a kid, but rarely made it myself due to the stirring and watching and possibility of milk burning. Happened to me multiple times and if you ever had the small of burned milk in your kitchen, you know it isn’t pleasant.

    All of this changed when I got my beloved Sage Fast Slow Pro. The notion of the pot just doing everything for me when it comes to both risotto and rice pudding was a revelation and opened a whole new range of dishes for me to enjoy, without dreading the ages of stirring.

    All it takes is 10-12 minutes of cooking and a few minutes more for the pressure release, and you can use any instant pot you have, to get the perfect rice pudding. Even late evening cravings can be satisfied in minutes. You let it do the work for you, while you have your post workout shower, to enjoy a healthy, protein packed meal.

    Can be made Vegan and Lactose free

    Being lactose intolerant always left me queasy after eating things like rice pudding or oatmeal. Took me years to realise why that is (being essentially gaslit into not trusting your own feeling leaves marks, doesn’t it?).
    Now I make all my dishes with various plant based milks and am just fine.

    A Note on Protein Powder

    I think I have said this many times on this blog, but I’ll include it here, as the protein powder is such an essential ingredient in this recipe: Despite being lactose intolerant, I do use Whey Protein powder from MyProtein.
    This is neither affiliated nor sponsored. Just the powder I found to taste best after trying a fair few. If you never found one you enjoy, give this one a try.
    I never had any issues with it and just can’t stomach the taste of the vegan ones. But if you have one you enjoy, you can of course use that.

    Why Protein?

    Protein is such an important building block for our bodies and its important to eat enough of it. Personally, as I don’t each much meat or legumes for that matter, I wouldn’t have enough in my diet to fulfil my bodies needs. Hence protein powder to the rescue. Preferably in sweet recipes.

     

    How to vary your Protein Rice Pudding

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways

    While this Protein Rice Pudding is utterly delicious on its own, topped with just a bit of cinnamon sugar, there are so many more options, that I decided to give you a few here.

    If you read any of my posts you probably stumbled over my way to lose weight and keep it stable and of course give my body the nutrition it needs, which is to include as many fruit and veggies as I can in every meal. This one is no exception.

    There are plenty of fruit that go fantastic with milky or creamy dishes, so you can wildly pick and choose your favourites. I’m giving you just a few ideas here.

    Cherry or Berry. Or Both.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Ingredients Cherry Compote

    My all-time favourite and a classic with rice pudding in Germany is cherry compote. Essentially sweet cherries briefly cooked with a tiny bit of water, to help them heat up and release their juices, then thickened with cornstarch. That’s as easy as it gets and works nicely with berries too. Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, or a mix of all would be lovely. Add a bit of vanilla and honey and you are set.

    Rice Curd-ish with Pomegranate and Grapes

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_ Rice Curd with pomegranate, grapes and pistachios

    Another variation, borrowed from a co-worker from India are grapes and pomegranate and the rice pudding being enriched with yoghurt, bringing it into the direction of a favourite summer dish from India: Rice curd. The yoghurt adds even more protein, especially if you are using any type of Greek yoghurt.
    A few pistachios sprinkled on top, a hint of cinnamon if you like will round this off nicely.

    Black Forest or Chocolate Hazelnut

    Now we can’t talk rice pudding without mentioning chocolate, can we?
    I mean I love chocolate anything of course, and who wouldn’t, but here it’s just so incredibly easy to include it simply via protein powder flavour and, if you want it extra chocolatey (as I always do) a bit cocoa and a hit of espresso powder, to enhance the flavour even more.

    Add some cherry compote or even fresh cherries and, if you are having this for dessert or feeling extra indulgent, some Kirsch (a German clear cherry liqueur), top with some whipped cream or coconut cream and you have yourself an irresistible treat.

    Want to add some crunch to this one? Roasted and chopped hazelnuts instead of cherries would transform this into a sort of Ferrero Rocher experience. Or drizzle over some melted chocolate or slightly warmed Nutella, to have an utterly indulgent, yet still reasonably healthy dessert.

    Mango-Coconut

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Mango Coconut

    Last but not least, a tropical mango-coconut rice pudding. You can either cook it straight from the start with coconut milk, or, as I did here, add some after cooking, for a gentle coconut flavour and stir in fresh mango pieces or mango puree. Or both.
    Take it over the top with toasted coconut flakes (can I convince you to make maple-lime coconut chips just for this? It’s so worth it!) and enjoy being taken to a tropical island via dessert.

    The Ingredients

     

    Of course some of the ingredients with depend on the flavour combination you choose, but the basic recipe is always the same:

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Basic ingredients

    1 cup pudding rice or use arborio as alternative. Round corn rice is best suited for pudding, as the grains absorb more liquid and contain more starch than, say Basmati rice, resulting in creamier rice pudding. And creamy is what we want here.

    4 cups liquid. You can use any type of milk you enjoy. If you aren’t lactose intolerant like me, whole milk is a great option. I’m using unsweetened almond milk to cook the rice in, then, after cooking, mix the protein powder with a bit of creamy soy or coconut milk, to add even more creaminess.

    A pinch of salt – I’m a firm believer of adding a bit of salt to anything sweet. It balances and enhances the flavour of everything it touches. There is a good reason why salted caramel is so popular!

    Protein Powder – This is my favourite way to get a high protein sweet meal. It sounds like a cheat, maybe it is. But I have yet to find a better way to add protein, sweetener, and whatever flavour you enjoy in one step to dishes. My Protein is my favourite brand, as it’s super creamy and doesn’t taste artificial. I mostly use the limited edition “Jelly Belly Buttered Popcorn”. Any good vanilla flavour would work too. Though I dread the day when this one reaches its time limit of the limited edition, as I’m utterly in love with it.

    For the Black Forest version I used Gold Standard Whey Chocolate, as I have a ton left from before discovering MyProtein. It’s pretty decent, if less creamy.

    Again, just to be clear: This is in no way sponsored or affiliated. Just what I use. Though if anyone from MyProtein reads this: Please sponsor me?

    The Process

     

    Pressure Cooker/ Instant Pot

    If you have a pressure cooker/instant pot/Sage Fast Slow Pro, this couldn’t be any easier:

    Add your rice and 3.5 cups of your milk of choice and pinch of salt to your cooker. Set to 10 minutes high pressure, then 10min auto release and let it do its thing while you get on with your day.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Process

    After the time is up, mix your chosen protein powder with the remaining half cup of milk or yoghurt until no lumps remain and stir it into your rice pudding. Don’t let it come to a boil after you mixed in the protein, or it might get a bit grainy.
    If you make a bigger portion for several days, I would advocate for adding the protein-milk mix just before eating, as rice pudding has the habit of thickening in the fridge. And if you add too much liquid, the rice might essentially dissolve. If you love that, feel free of course.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Process

    Add your chosen fruits and flavourings, decorate, and top to your heart’s desire and enjoy hot or cold.

    I often prepare a large portion at the start of the week, to have a super quick breakfast/dessert or even dinner (yep, I love sweet dinner! That’s my favourite way to satisfy sweet evening cravings: Make it a healthy dinner!).

    You can have this Protein Rice Pudding straight from the fridge for hot summer days or simply re-heat it in the microwave.

    On Stovetop:

    While I’m plain too lazy to make this on the stovetop, you can absolutely do that too.
    It will take about 20- 30 minutes of patient stirring and very gentle simmering to get creamy rice pudding.

    Tips and Tricks

    • If you have no round corn rice, you can use Basmati. It might not get as creamy though
    • In India, Rice Curd is made by using ready cooked Basmati rice and stirring in “curd”, which is similar to yoghurt, but thinner. So if you are feeling even lazier or just have leftover rice to use up, either stir some plain yoghurt with protein powder into it and top with fruit for a refreshing summer treat. Or heat it up in the microwave, stir in some milk mixed with protein powder and top with whatever your heart desires.
    • A classic Thai version of this would be to boil the rice in coconut milk. To get the best flavour, use the drinking version, not a can.
    • You can make this also with black rice, which would look absolutely stunning, or brown rice for added fibre. For those versions follow the cooking instructions for your particular rice. Time and needed liquid may vary.
    • Want even more protein? Add some chia seeds or hemp hearts and top with more Greek yoghurt. I love the 0% fat version, as I feel the rice has plenty of creaminess already.
    • Need extra indulgence and want this to taste like the classic rice pudding dessert? Temper an egg yolk by adding a bit of warm milk at the end of the cooking process and stir into the rice, warming it through gently, to avoid curdling the egg. Add some butter to take it over the top. May I suggest browned butter if you do?

     

    The 4 Different Versions

     

    All amounts and instructions are given to make 4 portions of the same variation.
    If you’d like to try all 4, as I did in the pictures, simply halve the amounts.

    Except the cherry compote. I would always make the full 2 cups, as I love it so much, I happily eat it over everything or on its own. Plus just boiling half a cup is too much hassle for the output.

    After your rice pudding is cooked mix 2 cups of milk/yoghurt/coconut milk with 4 scoops of your favourite protein powder. Depending on the version you are going for and stir into the rice until it reaches your preferred consistency.

    If you find it too cold after that, feel free to briefly microwave to heat it up, but don’t let it come to a boil again, or your protein might curdle a bit. Which still tastes ok, but doesn’t look as inviting and creamy.

    Cherry or Berry. Or Both.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_With Cherry Compote

    Use about 2 cups of fresh or frozen sweet cherries or mixed berries together with 1 tbsp of sugar (brown or white), maybe a little lemon juice or vanilla extract or both, if you like. In a pot on the stove, bring them to a boil, adding about 2-3 tbsp water, to help them release their juices. Mix ½ tbsp cornstarch with 2 tbsp water in a separate container. Once your cherries or berries are hot and bubbling, pour in your cornstarch slurry while stirring. Bring once more to the boil and stir until it thickens. Take off the heat and your compote is ready.

    I used this for both the cherry version and dusted it with a tiny bit of vanilla powder and in the Black Forest version.

    Mix 2 cups of soy milk with a good vanilla protein powder until no clumps remain, Stir into the rice pudding.

    Top with the cherry (or berry) compote and enjoy.

    Rice Curd (-ish) with Protein, Pomegranate, Grapes and Pistachios

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_ Rice Curd with pomegranate, grapes and pistachios

    If using a fresh pomegranate, cut it in half crosswise. Tuck one half into a small freezer bag. Ideally with a zip and close it, with the open side of the pomegranate pointing down.
    Now get a cooking spoon, Wood with the classic spoon shape works best I found.
    Start smacking the top of the pomegranate until all seeds have tumbled into the bag.
    Discard the empty shell and fish out any pieces of pith that might have fallen out.

    Halve the grapes. Roughly chop the pistachios if using.

    Mix 2 cups of yoghurt (I used 0% fat Greek yoghurt) with 4 scoops of a good vanilla protein powder until no lumps remain. Stir into the cooked rice pudding. Ideally after it has cooled a bit.

    This version is particularly good cold on a hot summer day.

    Mango-Coconut Protein Rice Pudding

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Mango Coconut

    Prepare your coconut chips if using.

    Pre-heat your oven to 350°F/175°C and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

    Mix 1 cup of coconut chips with 1 tbsp maple syrup, a pinch of salt and the grated zest of 1 lime.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Process Coconut chips

    Spead onto the baking sheet and bake for about 10-12 min, stirring halfway, until golden brown.
    Let them cool to crisp up while you prepare the mango. They will keep in an airtight container for about a week (if they last that long, as they are seriously more-ish). You will find reasons to make them again and again as snack or topping for sweets, cake, salad and even Thai soup or curries.

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Process Coconut chips

    Peel your mango and chop into bite sized cubes.

    Mix 2 cups of coconut milk (canned or from a tetra pack is both good) with 4 scoops of a good vanilla (or coconut) flavoured protein powder until no lumps remain.
    Stir into the ready cooked rice pudding, top with mango and coconut chips.

    Black Forest Protein Rice Pudding (or chocolate without the cherries)

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways_Black Forest

    Prepare the cherry compote as per instructions for the cherry version. If you feel extra indulgent, add some Kirsch.

    Whisk some cream or coconut cream into soft peaks. If using coconut cream, make sure it’s very cold or it won’t hold its shape. I found cans of coconut whipping cream at a local health food store, but using just the firm layer from a can of cold coconut milk will do just fine.

    Mix 2 cups of soy milk with 4 scoops of chocolate flavoured protein powder and 1 tbsp cocoa until no lumps remain. If you only have vanilla flavoured protein powder use that, but add 2-3 tbsp cocoa, depending on your preference.

    Stir the chocolate protein mix into the cooked rice pudding.

    In pretty glasses, layer some cherry compote, then rice pudding, finishing with more cherry compote and a large spoon or whipped cream or coconut cream.

    Decorate with fresh cherry and chocolate shavings if you like. I simply used a vegetable peeler to create shavings from a piece of dark chocolate.

    How to Store

     

    As mentioned above, I often meal prep a big batch for the week and store it in a lidded container in the fridge. It will keep quite happily for about 3-4 days, depending on the milk you used.
    If you want to mix it up, portion the Protein Rice Pudding into single portion jars and add your favourite toppings, to have an amazing meal to grab and go.

     

    Looking for other Protein Recipes?

    Take a look at these:

    Tiramisu Protein Oats Two Ways

    Sourdough Brownies with Protein

    Protein Banoffee Pie Yoghurt

    Banoffee Protein Mousse Pie

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!

    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please rate, share and/or comment. It helps me a lot!

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways

    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways

    Protein Rice Pudding has all the creamy decadence of the popular dessert, but with a healthy dose of protein. I’ve created 4 versions for you to choose from with different add-ins and toppings, so you have a healthy post workout meal ready for you any day. On top of that, if you have an instant pot, this can be ready for you in the time you take a shower. No stirring and standing at the hob required!
    5 from 6 votes
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Cook Time 10 minutes
    Pressure release 10 minutes
    Total Time 25 minutes
    Course Breakfast, Dessert, Dinner, Snack
    Cuisine American, Fusion
    Servings 4
    Calories 388 kcal

    Equipment

    • Instant pot or pot and hob

    Ingredients
      

    Basic version:

    • 1 cup pudding rice or Arborio
    • 3.5 cups unsweetened almond milk or milk of your choice
    • 2 cups soy milk or any other milk of your choice. Coconut for the Coconut-Mango variation
    • 4 scoops protein powder I used MyProtein Whey Buttered Popcorn. Any good vanilla flavoured powder will work fine. Since this is the main flavour component, please use one you enjoy.
    • 1 pinch salt
    • 2 tsp vanilla extract optional but lovely

    Topping Versions

    Cherry Protein Rice Pudding

    • 2 cups of cherries
    • ½ tbsp cornstarch
    • 1 tbsp sugar
    • 2 cups soy milk and 4 scoops vanilla protein powder as stated in basic version

    Rice Curd-ish with Pomegranate and Grapes

    • 1 Pomegranate seeds only (see post on how to get them out without a mess)
    • 1 cup grapes halved
    • 2 cups 0% fat Greek yoghurt instead of the soy milk in the basic version
    • 4 scoops vanilla protein powder as stated in the basic version
    • ½ cup pistachios roughly chopped

    Mango- Coconut Protein Rice Pudding

    • 1 cup coconut chips
    • 1 tbsp Maple syrup
    • 1 lime grated zest only
    • 1 mango chopped in bite sized cubes
    • 2 cups coconut milk canned or tetra pack
    • 4 scoops vanilla or coconut protein powder as stated in basic version

    Black Forest Protein Rice Pudding

    • 2 cups of cherries
    • ½ tbsp cornstarch
    • 1 tbsp sugar
    • 1 tbsp Kirsch optional
    • 2 cups soy milk
    • 4 scoops chocolate protein powder instead of vanilla as stated in basic version
    • 1 tbsp cocoa
    • ½ cup whipped cream or whipped coconut cream or to taste
    • 1 small piece dark chocolate shaved with vegetable peeler, to decorate

    Instructions
     

    Using a Pressure Cooker/Instant Pot/Sage Fast Slow Pro:

    • In the cooker, combine the rice, 3.5 cups of almond milk (or milk of your choice), and a pinch of salt.
    • Set the cooker to 10 minutes on high pressure, then allow for a 10-minute auto release.
    • While the rice cooks, mix the protein powder with the remaining 2 cups of milk until smooth.
    • After the pressure cooking cycle completes, stir the protein-milk mixture into the rice pudding gently. Avoid boiling after adding protein to prevent graininess.
    • If preparing a larger portion for multiple days, add the protein-milk mix just before serving to avoid over-thickening and potential rice dissolution. 1/2 cup of soy milk +1 scoop of protein powder per portion.
    • Customize with your chosen fruits and flavourings, and top with desired toppings.
    • Serve hot or cold. Refrigerate leftovers for future servings.

    On the Stovetop:

    • In a saucepan, combine the rice, 3.5 cups of almond milk (or milk of your choice), and a pinch of salt.
    • Bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally.
    • Simmer for about 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until the rice pudding reaches a creamy consistency.
    • Follow steps 3-7 from the pressure cooker instructions to complete the dish.
    • Enjoy your protein-rich rice pudding as a quick breakfast, dessert, or even dinner option! Adjust toppings and flavourings to suit your preferences.

    Cherry Protein Rice Pudding

    • Prepare the cherry compote by simmering cherries, sugar, and a splash of water until hot.
    • Mix cornstarch with water, then add to the cherries, boil and stir to thicken.
    • Mix soy milk and vanilla protein powder and stir into the cooked rice pudding.
    • Serve topped with cherry compote.

    Rice Curd-ish with Pomegranate and Grapes

    • Extract pomegranate seeds. See post on how to get them out without a mess.
    • Halve grapes and chop pistachios.
    • Mix yogurt and vanilla protein powder, then stir into rice pudding.
    • Serve chilled, topped with pomegranate seeds, grapes, and pistachios.

    Mango-CoconutProtein Rice Pudding

    • Mix coconut chips with maple syrup and lime zest, bake on a parchment lined baking sheet at 350°F/175°C for about 10min until golden.
    • Mix coconut milk and protein powder, then stir into rice pudding.
    • Serve topped with mango and coconut chips.

    Black Forest Protein Rice Pudding

    • Prepare the cherry compote by simmering cherries, sugar, and a splash of water until boiling and cherries are hot.
    • Mix cornstarch with 2 tbsp water, then add to the cherries to thicken.
    • Add 1 tbsp Kirsch if desired
    • Mix soy milk with chocolate protein powder and cocoa.
    • Stir into cooked rice pudding.
    • Layer with cherry compote and top with whipped cream.
    • Decorate with chocolate shavings if you like.

    Notes

    The nutrition here is given for the basic Protein Rice pudding. It will vary slightly depending on the toppings, though the protein will remain roughly the same. Slightly more for the curd version due to the greek youghurt, slightly less for the coconut mango version, as the coconut milk has less protein than soy milk.
    How to Store
    As mentioned above, I often meal prep a big batch for the week and store it in a lidded container in the fridge. It will keep quite happily for about 3-5 days, depending on the milk you used.
    If you want to mix it up, portion the Protein Rice Pudding into single portion jars and add your favourite toppings, to have an amazing meal to grab and go.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 388kcalCarbohydrates: 48gProtein: 33gFat: 7gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 50mgSodium: 399mgPotassium: 297mgFiber: 3gSugar: 5gVitamin A: 544IUVitamin C: 8mgCalcium: 527mgIron: 5mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Protein Rice Pudding 4 Ways
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    388
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    7
    g
    11
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    1
    g
    6
    %
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    3
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    2
    g
    Cholesterol
     
    50
    mg
    17
    %
    Sodium
     
    399
    mg
    17
    %
    Potassium
     
    297
    mg
    8
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    48
    g
    16
    %
    Fiber
     
    3
    g
    13
    %
    Sugar
     
    5
    g
    6
    %
    Protein
     
    33
    g
    66
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    544
    IU
    11
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    8
    mg
    10
    %
    Calcium
     
    527
    mg
    53
    %
    Iron
     
    5
    mg
    28
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Breakfast, Easy, High Protein, pressure cooker, vegan, Vegetarian, versatile
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    This super pretty pink Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein will brighten up your table while bringing you a zesty and nutty tasting cake that is very easy to make. The sponge is full of pistachio-orange flavour, while still feeling light enough to have it any day with a nice cup of tea or coffee in the afternoon. What’s more: It comes with about 10g of protein per slice, meaning you get your nutrition from your dessert. The candied orange slices are optional, but highly recommended and once you made them, you’ll wonder why you ever bought them, it’s so simple.

     

    Why You Will Love This

    I mean look at it! Doesn’t it lift your mood simply because it’s there? It sure does for me. But if you need more reasons, here we go.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Easy to Make

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein is essentially a very simple sponge cake you can whip up in a few minutes. The only special equipment you’ll need is a food processor, do grind the pistachios, as they can be hard to find pre-ground.

    The icing comes together in seconds and the candied oranges take just a few minutes on the hob and some drying time.

    This cake is just as good as impressive centre piece for afternoon tea with guests, as it is to have just by yourself during the week, because of how easy it is to make and how well it keeps due to the pistachio-rich batter.

    Pretty Pink and Entirely Natural Icing

    Blood Oranges give you an incredibly pretty icing without any food colouring. Even though not all of them have the dark red shades on the skin, the juice tends to be a really intense red, which will colour the simply icing sugar mix just on its own. No colour needed.

    Protein

    If you read some of my dessert recipes, you probably noticed I include protein powder in most of them. This is because I made dessert essentially a main meal. Due to my busy fulltime job, I rarely have time to eat breakfast, so usually I meal prep lunch and something sweet for the evening on my weekends, to have it ready during the week.

    Now, would I eat “normal” desserts, which usually have very little nutrition, that would probably not be a good idea. But I try to incorporate fruits, nuts, protein, and nutritionally dense carbs in everything I make, meaning I fuel my body with them and there is no reason to feel bad about eating them.

    Dessert for Breakfast. Or Dinner?

    The above distribution of my meals (including this Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein) is very intentionally structured around what I feel like eating at the time of day I have the food.
    Usually, having “lunch” as my first meal, I feel like something savoury, ideally with lots of veggies, that will fuel me until dinner.

    While in the evening, after the stresses of the day, I almost always crave something sweet. Do I use the food to reward myself? Absolutely. But by doing this in an intentional way and including all the nutrition my body needs in it, I feel pretty great about it too.

    Pistachios for Lovely Contrast and Flavour

    This recipe was inspired by one from “Nistisima” by Georgina Hayden for a vegan walnut-orange cake, that is often eaten during fasting.
    I wanted protein in my cake and pretty green pistachios instead of walnuts, to provide a contrast to the bright colours and flavour of the blood oranges. Also slightly lower calories. So I adapted the recipe accordingly.

    The Ingredients

    I’m giving just a few of the ingredients here and why I used them. For the full list, please see the recipe.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein_Ingredients

    Blood Oranges

    Blood oranges are in season, so I wanted to make a dessert that really showcases their pretty colour and bright, intense flavour. I feel this Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein does just that. Both their juice and zest are used in the sponge, more juice to make the pink icing and they get candied to create an amazing and very snackable topping.

    They also contain lots of fibre and vitamin C together with and whole range of other nutrients, meaning they are really good for you. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/blood-orange-benefits

    If Blood Oranges are not in season, you can of course use normal oranges. They just won’t add the pink colour to the icing. Or use blood orange juice from the fridge in your supermarket. I’ve seen one brand having it relatively regularly.

    Pistachios

    While it was near impossible to get shelled pistachios in Ireland for a while, they are slowly becoming more common. I found mine at Holland & Barrett, but also saw some at Dunnes.
    Depending on where you live, you might want to check health food shops for them, as they seem to be easier to find there.

    Pistachios are rich in nutrients, one of the lowest calorie nuts and high in protein.

    That being said, Pistachios are not a “nut” in the biological sense, but rather in the same family called “drupes” together with cashews and almonds. Which also explains their affinity with most foods that almonds go so well with.

    If pistachios are very expensive where you live, you could replace either half or all of them with almonds and the cake would still be delicious. Just not as pretty light green.

    Protein

    I’m using as usual my favourite (neither sponsored nor affiliated) MyProtein Whey. In this case their Buttered Popcorn flavour.
    Vanilla flavour would work great too.

    You could use vegan or casein protein powder, which I read are especially great for baking, but I absolutely despise the flavour of all vegan powders I have tried, and found MyProtein Whey to work rather fantastic in any dessert. So swap at your own risk.

    Apart from the beneficial added protein, the powder replaces part of the plain flour and sugar, which brings the nutrition up and the calories down. Win/win.

    Whole Wheat Flour

    To up the nutty flavour of this cake, I swapped part of the more typically used plain flour for whole wheat flour. Fine to be specific. This is particularly nice for cakes, as it’s finer ground than the typically coarse whole wheat flour you’d use for bread, but still has all of the nutrition of the whole grain.

    Icing

    Blood Orange Icing_Ingredients

    All you need for the pink icing is icing sugar and blood orange juice. Extremely simple and very delicious. It also “seals” the cake, keeping in the moisture, so it will last for a few days on your counter.

    Candied Oranges

    Candied Blood Oranges_Ingredients

    I know, everything candied sounds so very complicated, doesn’t it?
    I can assure you, it’s not. Orange slices, sugar and water is all you need. It’s entirely made on the hob. A sugar thermometer is needed.

     

    Making this Cake Vegan

    To transform this cake into a vegan one, simply replace the 2 eggs with another 1/2 cup of light olive oil and use a vegan protein powder.

    The Process

    The Candied Blood Oranges

    Start by making the candied oranges if you chose to include them. This will make a few more than you need, which is perfect, as they are great for nibbling.

    Prepare a sheet pan with a wire rack by placing some baking parchment under the wire, for less mess to clean up later.

    First bring a pot with water to the boil and prepare a bowl of iced water. Once boiling, gently lower your orange slices into the water and simmer for 2 minutes, taking them out with a slotted spoon when done and plunging them into the ice bath. This will remove some of the bitterness from the peel.

    Candied Blood Oranges_Process

    Next add your cup of sugar and ½ cup of water to a medium saucepan. The little red flecks you see in the pot above are orange juice from the cut off ends I squeezed into it.

    Stir while bringing it to the boil, so the sugar can dissolve. Once it boils, stop stirring and just swirl the pot occasionally, to prevent sugar crystals from forming. If any form on the sides of the pot, use a wet brush to push them down.

    Let the syrup come to 225°F/110°C, then gently and in layers, lower all the orange slices into it.
    Continue to simmer the mix until it reaches about 230°F/115°C (Keep an eye on it. You don’t want it to turn into dark caramel accidentally) while carefully turning the orange slices once with thongs or a spatula. Once the target temperature is reached, your syrup should be fairly thick.

    Pick out the now candied orange slices one by one with a fork or thongs and place on the wire rack. Be sure to keep a bit of space between them, so they don’t stick together.
    Leave to cool for at least 1h.

    Candied Blood Oranges

    If you are not using them immediately, they can be stored in a lidded container in the fridge for up to a week. So you can prepare them ahead of time. Ideally keep them in single layers on baking parchment, to keeping them for becoming one huge sticky orange piece.

    The Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Start by greasing a springform and line the bottom with baking parchment. This is easiest if you lay the parchment over the loose bottom, then fasten the ring around it and cut off the overlap.

    Preheat your oven to 375°F/190°C

    In a large bowl, using a hand mixer or with your stand mixer, whisk together sugar and oil. Note the sugar won’t entirely dissolve, as it might in butter. That’s fine. Just whisk for a few minutes until it’s mostly there. Add the eggs one by one and mix until light and foamy and the sugar has dissolved. In doubt rub some of the mix between your fingertips. If it’s still slightly grainy, mix a bit longer until it feels smooth.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein_Process

    Now you can add all the remaining wet ingredients and the protein powder. Continue whisking until really smooth and foamy. This will add lift to the sponge.

    In a separate bowl, mix the remaining dry ingredients, keeping ¼ cup of chopped pistachios back for garnish later.

    Add the dry to the wet and gently fold in with a spoon or silicone spatula until no dry flour remains. Don’t overmix, or you will develop the gluten and your sponge will become tough.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein_Process

    Pour the batter into your prepared springform. Bake for 30 – 45 minutes, rotating once if your oven bakes unevenly, until it’s nicely browned and a toothpick comes out clean or with just a few crumbs.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein_Process

    Leave the cake to cool in the form for about 10minutes, then take it out of the springform and let it cool completely on a wire rack. Don’t add the icing while still warm, or it will just soak into the cake. Which is still delicious, but not as pretty.

     

    The Blood Orange Icing

    Juice your last blood orange and add the icing sugar to a bowl or small jug. Start by adding 2-3 tbsp of the juice to the sugar and, using a small whisk, incorporating it until there is no liquid left. Judge the consistency. It should be thick, but still drizzleable (is that a word? If not, it should be!). Add more juice or sugar if it’s not quite right.

    Blood Orange Icing_Process

    Pour the icing over your cake, first one half, spread with a spatula or back of a large spoon, then add more where you feel it’s a bit thin. You could also do this in two layers, letting the first one dry completely before you add the second. Use a spatula to spread some of the icing that has run off onto the sides to complete the look.

    Blood Orange Icing_Process
    Let the icing dry completely before you decorate the cake.

     

    Decorate and Serve

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Just before serving your Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein, decorate it with the candied oranges and remaining chopped pistachios. Slice and enjoy with a lovely cup of hot tea or coffee. Earl Grey would be particularly fitting here.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Getting Ahead

     

    Both the sponge and candied oranges can be made the day before. The orange slices keep well in a lidded container in the fridge. Ideally each layer separated by baking parchment, to prevent them from sticking to each other.

    The cake will be fine for up to 5 days covered with kitchen foil or clingfilm. I used kitchen foil and domed it, so it wouldn’t touch the oranges and stick to them.

    The cake also freezes well. Even with the icing, though it will soak into the cake a bit when thawing and not be as pretty anymore. So ideally ice later. Or just enjoy the extra flavour that soaked into the cake.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    If you liked this recipe, you might also like:

    Pistachio Muffins with Apricots and Protein 

    Lemon Poppy Sourdough Zucchini Bread with Protein 

    Banoffee Protein Mousse Pie

    Please Comment

    Now I’d love to hear from you in the comments!
    Have you tried this? Did you enjoy it?
    What other recipes would you like to see?

    If you enjoyed this recipe, please share and comment. It helps me a lot.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein

    This super pretty pink Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein will brighten up your table while bringing you a zesty and nutty tasting cake that is very easy to make. The sponge is full of pistachio-orange flavour, while still feeling light enough to have it any day with a nice cup of tea or coffee in the afternoon. What’s more: It comes with about 10g of protein per slice, meaning you get your nutrition from your dessert. The candied orange slices are optional, but highly recommended and once you made them, you’ll wonder why you ever bought them, it’s so simple.
    5 from 25 votes
    Prep Time 40 minutes
    Cook Time 1 hour
    Cooling and drying time 2 hours
    Total Time 3 hours 40 minutes
    Course Cake, Dessert
    Cuisine American
    Servings 12
    Calories 468 kcal

    Equipment

    • Food Processor, sugar thermometer, springform

    Ingredients
      

    Sponge:

    • ½ cup olive oil light
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 ¼ cups pistachios finely chop 1 cup, keep 1/4 for decorating, grind rest
    • 4 blood oranges zest 1 + juice until you have 1 cup.
    • ¾ cup plain flour
    • ½ cup +2 tbsp whole wheat flour fine
    • 2/3 cup protein powder I used MyProtein buttered popcorn flavour. Vanilla works too
    • ¾ cup brown sugar
    • 2 tsp baking powder
    • ½ tsp baking soda
    • ½ tsp kosher salt
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon

    Icing:

    • 1 blood orange
    • 1.5 cups icing sugar

    Candied Blood Orange Slices:

    • 3 Blood Oranges cut into 0.2in slices
    • 1 cup sugar
    • ½ cup water

    Instructions
     

    Candied Blood Orange Slices:

    • Bring a pot of water to a boil and prepare a bowl of iced water.
    • Blanch the orange slices in boiling water for 2 minutes, then transfer them to the ice bath.
    • In a medium saucepan, combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil, swirling the pan occasionally until the sugar dissolves.
    • Once the syrup reaches 225°F/110°C, gently add the orange slices in layers.
    • Simmer until the syrup thickens and reaches about 230°F/115°C, ensuring the orange slices are evenly coated.
    • Using tongs or a fork, transfer the candied orange slices to a wire rack placed over a baking sheet. Allow them to cool for at least 1 hour.

    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein:

    • Preheat the oven to 375°F/190°C. Grease a springform pan and line the bottom with parchment paper.
    • In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil and brown sugar until mostly dissolved. Add eggs one at a time, mixing until light and foamy.
    • Stir in the blood orange zest, juice, and protein powder until smooth and foamy.
    • In a separate bowl, combine the flours, ground pistachios (reserving 1/4 cup for garnish), baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon.
    • Gradually fold the dry ingredients into the wet mixture until just combined. Be careful not to overmix.
    • Pour the batter into the prepared springform pan and bake for 30-45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean.
    • Allow the cake to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before transferring it to a wire rack to cool completely.

    Blood Orange Icing:

    • In a bowl or small jug, combine the blood orange juice with icing sugar. Start with 2-3 tablespoons of juice and adjust to reach a thick but pourable consistency.
    • Drizzle the icing over the cooled cake, spreading it evenly with a spatula.
    • Allow the icing to set completely before decorating.

    Decorate and Serve:

    • Arrange the candied blood orange slices on top of the cake and sprinkle with the reserved chopped pistachios.
    • Slice and serve the cake with a nice cup of tea or coffee.

    Notes

    Getting Ahead
    Both the sponge and candied oranges can be made the day before. The orange slices keep well in a lidded container in the fridge. Ideally each layer separated by baking parchment, to prevent them from sticking to each other.
    The cake will be fine for up to 5 days covered with kitchen foil or clingfilm. I used kitchen foil and domed it, so it wouldn’t touch the oranges and stick to them.
    The cake also freezes well. Even with the icing, though it will soak into the cake a bit when thawing and not be as pretty anymore. So ideally ice later. Or just enjoy the extra flavour that soaked into the cake.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 468kcalCarbohydrates: 63gProtein: 12gFat: 21gSaturated Fat: 3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 4gMonounsaturated Fat: 12gTrans Fat: 0.003gCholesterol: 37mgSodium: 238mgPotassium: 326mgFiber: 3gSugar: 48gVitamin A: 172IUVitamin C: 6mgCalcium: 107mgIron: 2mg
    Nutrition Facts
    Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake with Protein
    Amount per Serving
    Calories
    468
    % Daily Value*
    Fat
     
    21
    g
    32
    %
    Saturated Fat
     
    3
    g
    19
    %
    Trans Fat
     
    0.003
    g
    Polyunsaturated Fat
     
    4
    g
    Monounsaturated Fat
     
    12
    g
    Cholesterol
     
    37
    mg
    12
    %
    Sodium
     
    238
    mg
    10
    %
    Potassium
     
    326
    mg
    9
    %
    Carbohydrates
     
    63
    g
    21
    %
    Fiber
     
    3
    g
    13
    %
    Sugar
     
    48
    g
    53
    %
    Protein
     
    12
    g
    24
    %
    Vitamin A
     
    172
    IU
    3
    %
    Vitamin C
     
    6
    mg
    7
    %
    Calcium
     
    107
    mg
    11
    %
    Iron
     
    2
    mg
    11
    %
    * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
    Keyword Easy, For Guests, fruit, Protein, Vegetarian
    Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!